Contemporary Application of Building Reclaimed Longleaf Pine

Goodwin was proud to be part of the Nimbus building project in Gainesville, Florida.  We milled pine beams from an old depot building that was previously on the site to create gorgeous building reclaimed longleaf pine walls. Take a look:

River-Recovered® and reclaimed wood is perfect for energy efficient buildings such as Nimbus, as antique wood is an excellent insulator. And, let’s not forget to mention that it perfectly complements and warms up any modern space.  There are many contemporary uses for antique longleaf pine. Contact us to explore how this beautiful wood can make over your home or office.

Preserving the Past by Educating Our Future

Graduate Students Visit Goodwin for a Lesson in Reclaimed Wood

Goodwin Company is located just outside of Payne’s Prairie Preserve and within close proximity of the University of Florida (UF) campus.  This presents an opportunity for us to actively participate in education and environmental responsibility. Goodwin has partnered with UF to incorporate our antique wood into their contemporary, sustainable design projects, including:

  • The Dasburg House, home of Dr. Kent Fuchs, university president. This project featured Goodwin’s River-Recovered® Vertical Heart Pine, Legacy (building reclaimed) Vertical Heart Pine and Curly Heart Pine
  • The Otis Hawkins Center for UF athletes, which features 10,000 square feet of sustainable River-Recovered® Heart Pine ceiling and paneling.
  • The Periplanómenos Whistles featured on campus and handcrafted using Goodwin’s sinker cypress.

Last year, Goodwin had another opportunity to partner with UF.  We hosted graduate students from the school’s architecture program.  Jeffrey Forbes taught them about the history of Goodwin’s antique woods and our manufacturing process.  He also discussed the benefits of specifying Goodwin’s River-Recovered® and building reclaimed antique heart pine and heart cypress, especially in sustainable design. We believe we have an obligation to introduce students to reclaimed wood while emphasizing the importance of designing with sustainably sourced building materials. Through interactions with upcoming architects and designers, we hope to impact the future to reflect the craftsmanship and resiliency of our past.

Enjoy this short video highlighting their visit.

Goodwin Company Featured at IBS 2017

Goodwin Company Featured Alongside the Hottest Contemporary Home Ideas at IBS 2017

Goodwin Company was proud to show off our wood at the 2017 International Builders’ Show (IBS).  This year, the show featured the latest in contemporary home ideas.  We were excited to see just how many ways our River-Recovered® Heart Pine and River-Recovered Heart Cypress can be used to complement the numerous products showcased.

Special thank you to Hafele America. Their booth featured a beautiful Heart Cypress slab countertop. Michael Bright of Bright Woodworks in St. Petersburg, Florida crafted it using Goodwin wood. It was one of the biggest hits of the show!

Jeffrey Forbes, Goodwin’s marketing coordinator, produced this wonderful video summarizing the 2017 IBS:

IBS 2017 reinforced that sustainable design is becoming more and more important to consumers. Goodwin has and always will operate using sustainable, eco-friendly manufacturing practices. Esteemed architects and designers specify Goodwin’s materials for all types of work, including modern and sustainable design projects.

2017 is the year to add wood to your contemporary space.  Wood walls are especially chic and add depth, warmth and character. Not only is it easy to install, but its insulation benefits are impressive (one inch of wood is equivalent to 15” of concrete).  Incorporating wood on the outside of your home or corporate space is also “in” for 2017.  Antique Heart Cypress, including the on-hand, faster ship stock Goodwin currently on has special, is perfect for exterior ceiling and paneling because it is not only absolutely gorgeous, but also rot resistant.

Enjoy Jeffrey’s video from IBS, and give us a call to see how we can help you make over your space in 2017.

When Antique Wood Meets Modern Technology

Now, you must admit, this is really, really neat.  Have you ever wondered how antique wood paneling is installed on the outside of a building?  Click the link below to watch a LIVE feed of Goodwin’s River-Recovered® Heart Cypress siding being installed on the Menil Drawing Institute (MDI) in Houston, Texas:

https://www.workzonecam.com/projects/gilbanebuilding4/menildrawing/workzonecam2

MDI was established in 2008 and the new building – designed by the esteemed Los Angeles firm Johnson Marklee Architects –  is the latest addition to the Menil Collection campus. MDI was founded to recognize the crucial role “drawing” plays in the culture of modern and contemporary art.  This internationally recognized institute has become a center point for numerous exhibitions, collaborations and scholarships.

Goodwin worked closely with Johnson Marklee Architects on this project.  The exterior of the MDI will complement the original Menil Collection that is clad with 36,000 lf of Goodwin’s River Recovered-Heart Cypress siding. Goodwin was specified for this project because our antique heart cypress is durable and rot-resistant. The sinker cypress paneling was painted to match the original architecture of the building.

Let us know what you think of the LIVE feed!

 

Raised Local

Local.  Growing up in a tourist destination, I often heard this word.  It was a defense people used or a title they adopted to identify themselves with their city.  Being a local seemed to give people a sense of self.  Today, I more typically hear the word local used to express the quality or integrity of a product, rather than a person.

Not too long ago, everything was local and distinguishing a product as such would have seemed redundant. But now, with just a few taps on our smartphones, we have access to almost any product worldwide.  Because of this, I find myself buying specific products online so I can read reviews and compare features to ensure I am getting the best.  But, when I do this, I am sacrificing locality for quality.  What if we didn’t have to make this choice?  What if I could have quality products, personalized to my needs, knowing they were still produced sustainably and locally?

Let’s take a look at Goodwin Company. They manufacture a high quality product available globally, but sourced and manufactured locally.

Quality- Goodwin offers 100% old growth heart wood that is harvested in compliance with the Florida Deadhead Logging Permit to ensure protection of ecosystems.

Personalized-The Heritage Wood Finish Company, in partnership with Goodwin, specializes in finishes for heart wood. Their finishes are second in hardness only to diamonds and are available in an array of colors. All finishes have low to no VOCs and are safe for children and pets.

floridaforestmapLocal– Goodwin wood is recovered from southern U.S. Rivers including Suwannee, Santa Fe, and the St. John’s Rivers. Goodwin was the first reclaimed wood company in America to manufacture engineered wood flooring in this country.

Sustainable- Wood is sourced from 19th century industrial buildings, storm damaged trees, and sustainably harvested forests. Sawmill shavings are sold to be used in Biomass plants and the company is looking for ways to implement a solar sawmill as well as wind energy.

riverlogging

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Lauren ColeyGuest Post by Lauren Corley

Lauren Corley is a guest author for Goodwin and is a senior in the Innovation Academy at the University of Florida studying Sustainability in the Built Environment with a minor in Innovation. She began her involvement with Goodwin at the 2015 Greenbuild conference in Washington D.C. She is from the Panhandle of Florida and gained an interest for sustainability and its use in space as a high school student. Since moving to Gainesville she has interned for the Repurpose Project as well as the Alachua County Public Schools under the Energy Conservation Specialist.

Naturally Modern

If you’re the mom who had the fewest hours of sleep this week, the employee working the longest shift, or are the business person with the craziest schedule, you’ve won the silent contest nagging all of us.  It seems that somewhere along the way, we’ve started glorifying busyness.  If we could take an honest look at our lives, I think we could agree this cycle is pointless. As a result of trying to cope with this constant state of exhaustion, we have turned towards modern design in our space. Its simplicity and functionality seems to appeal to the hectic lifestyles we have created for ourselves.

Simplicity.

When you hear the words modern design, images of steel pipes, concrete structures, open spaces, and smooth surfaces may come to mind.  Maybe you pictured a geometric chair in an otherwise relatively vacant space.

But modern design is much more than these extreme images—it strives to seamlessly transition the simplicity of nature into man-built space. Without explicitly natural elements, these spaces seem to fall short.  Wood tends to get forgotten in modern design, dismissed as traditional or stuffy.  But the simplicity of wood is innate and timeless.  It stands alone, bringing the simplicity of nature to any modern space.

Functionality.

What does it do?  Because wood is innately simple and beautiful, it has the ability to perform both functionally and artistically in a space.  Whether its edges are left rough as a tabletop or sanded smooth for flooring or paneling, wood is a diverse material that lends itself to a variety of applications.  Without the use of wood, modern design is vulnerable to creating useful spaces that are unlivable.  But wood brings a certain kind of softness, as Kinfolk’s Tina Minami Dhingra described, without forfeiting beauty, function, or simplicity.[1]

Goodwin’s wood bar top at Swamp Head brewery in Gainesville, Florida shows the practicality and beauty of heart wood in modern spaces.  The unique cuts of the wood bring an artistic yet functional appeal to the brewery, warming up the space making it a more conversational and livable environment.  This natural element is at home even among more traditional modern materials like the metal stools and concrete floors—proving the products versatility, integrating interior and exterior space while exemplifying responsible use of nature’s resources and bringing beauty to a space through a material once thought lost.[1]

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Lauren ColeyGuest Post by Lauren Corley

Lauren Corley is a guest author for Goodwin and is a senior in the Innovation Academy at the University of Florida studying Sustainability in the Built Environment with a minor in Innovation. She began her involvement with Goodwin at the 2015 Greenbuild conference in Washington D.C. She is from the Panhandle of Florida and gained an interest for sustainability and its use in space as a high school student. Since moving to Gainesville she has interned for the Repurpose Project as well as the Alachua County Public Schools under the Energy Conservation Specialist.

Sources: Sparke, Penny. “The Modern Interior Revisited.” Journal of Interior Design 34.1 (2008): V-Xii. Web.

[1] “THE KINFOLK HOME TOURS: THE SELF-MADE MODERNIST – Kinfolk.” Kinfolk. N.p., 2014. Web. 19 Aug. 2016.

 

Pop-A-Top

We were so excited to visit the new Pop-A-Top General Store at Depot Park. Goodwin’s Legacy heart pine floors and wall paneling make the old depot look as it did when it was first built in 1859[1]. Once a gathering place for travelers, the old train depot is now a community space again—but this time it is a congregation area for those who want to kick back and stay a while.  Park-goers can even stop in for a cool drink in a nostalgic atmosphere.

Goodwin is proud to have been a part of this renovation project. We provided our Legacy heart pine flooring back in 2012. Now, with the opening of the park, we have seen the space come alive. We love this type of project because it is both sustainable design and historic restoration through and through. At Goodwin, we get to see forgotten, antique wood brought to life each day. We understand the value of our history and its integral role in shaping our future.

 

Lauren ColeyGuest Post by Lauren Corley

Lauren Corley is a guest author for Goodwin and is a senior in the Innovation Academy at the University of Florida studying Sustainability in the Built Environment with a minor in Innovation. She began her involvement with Goodwin at the 2015 Greenbuild conference in Washington D.C. She is from the Panhandle of Florida and gained an interest for sustainability and its use in space as a high school student. Since moving to Gainesville she has interned for the Repurpose Project as well as the Alachua County Public Schools under the Energy Conservation Specialist.

[1] https://www.theclio.com/web/entry?id=21025

Biophilia

Bringing the Outdoor into Indoor Spaces

Biophilia.  Literally meaning love of life—it’s a fancy word to explain people’s innate affection for the natural world.[1]  This might be why we love natural light, raw materials, and turn to earthy colors for calming environments.  We are desperately trying to bring the outdoors into our indoor spaces and it is evident in our design choices.

Wood uniquely provides a natural element while adding warmth.  This sinker cypress slab countertop balances the tension between smooth and rough surfaces from one edge of the board to the other.  The density of heart cypress wood is a result of its dense growth-rings, giving a smooth and almost soft appearance to the hard heart wood.  And the rough edge brings out the rawness of the material, establishing its authenticity.

hafelekbisslab

The heart pine beams relive their past in the Cirrus Logic building in Austin, Texas.  Sourced from 19th century industrial buildings, Goodwin’s Legacy beams bring warmth and livability to this modern space—complete with plenty of natural light and earthy tones.

cirruslogic

Goodwin’s River-Recovered® heart cypress gives the central accent wall an inviting and soothing aesthetic. This natural element is still at home among modern materials like metal and glass. The combination of the wood accent wall and indoor plants draw outdoors in, bringing together two worlds as the biophilia in all of us longs to do.

telecom-drive-009

For more innovative ideas of how to use wood in modern spaces check out this post by Apartment Therapy.

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Lauren ColeyGuest Post by Lauren Corley

Lauren Corley is a guest author for Goodwin and is a senior in the Innovation Academy at the University of Florida studying Sustainability in the Built Environment with a minor in Innovation. She began her involvement with Goodwin at the 2015 Greenbuild conference in Washington D.C. She is from the Panhandle of Florida and gained an interest for sustainability and its use in space as a high school student. Since moving to Gainesville she has interned for the Repurpose Project as well as the Alachua County Public Schools under the Energy Conservation Specialist.

[1]http://www.dictionary.com/browse/biophilia