Biophilia

Bringing the Outdoor into Indoor Spaces

Biophilia.  Literally meaning love of life—it’s a fancy word to explain people’s innate affection for the natural world.[1]  This might be why we love natural light, raw materials, and turn to earthy colors for calming environments.  We are desperately trying to bring the outdoors into our indoor spaces and it is evident in our design choices.

Wood uniquely provides a natural element while adding warmth.  This sinker cypress slab countertop balances the tension between smooth and rough surfaces from one edge of the board to the other.  The density of heart cypress wood is a result of its dense growth-rings, giving a smooth and almost soft appearance to the hard heart wood.  And the rough edge brings out the rawness of the material, establishing its authenticity.

Biophilia

The heart pine beams relive their past in the Cirrus Logic building in Austin, Texas.  Sourced from 19th century industrial buildings, Goodwin’s Legacy beams bring warmth and livability to this modern space—complete with plenty of natural light and earthy tones.

Biophilia

Goodwin’s River-Recovered® heart cypress gives the central accent wall an inviting and soothing aesthetic. This natural element is still at home among modern materials like metal and glass. The combination of the wood accent wall and indoor plants draw outdoors in, bringing together two worlds as the biophilia in all of us longs to do.

Biophilia

For more innovative ideas of how to use wood in modern spaces check out this post by Apartment Therapy.

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BiophiliaGuest Post by Lauren Corley

Lauren Corley is a guest author for Goodwin and is a senior in the Innovation Academy at the University of Florida studying Sustainability in the Built Environment with a minor in Innovation. She began her involvement with Goodwin at the 2015 Greenbuild conference in Washington D.C. She is from the Panhandle of Florida and gained an interest for sustainability and its use in space as a high school student. Since moving to Gainesville she has interned for the Repurpose Project as well as the Alachua County Public Schools under the Energy Conservation Specialist.

[1]http://www.dictionary.com/browse/biophilia

Using Antique Wood to Warm Up a Contemporary Space

When it comes to warming up an contemporary interior with antique wood, Chris Webb of CW Interiors, Inc. is a master! Chris sourced our Legacy® building reclaimed heart pine and sinker cypress for this residential remodel just last year. What do you think about these beautiful tongue and groove Legacy® building reclaimed heart pine walls?

Using Antique Wood to Warm Up a Contemporary SpaceUsing Antique Wood to Warm Up a Contemporary Space

These were handcrafted for a homeowner in Tampa, Florida. Incorporating antique wood in contemporary design is most definitely trending, especially among millennials who value both the uniqueness and sustainability of reclaimed wood.

Chris also built in a stunning heart cypress credenza to complement the room. Here is a closer look:

Using Antique Wood to Warm Up a Contemporary Space

The Legacy building reclaimed heart pine shelves really complete the space.

Using Antique Wood to Warm Up a Contemporary Space

When using reclaimed woods, the design possibilities are limitless. We find many clients really love the look and feel of sinker cypress. And, since antique heart cypress is rot-resistant, it is perfect for outdoor applications, including siding and ceilings.

Are you ready for a change? If so, give us a call. Whether your space is modern or traditional, antique heart cypress and heartpine offers a beautiful and desirable upgrade to any room in your home or office.

Photos by Native House Photography

Naples Botanical Gardens – Handmade Bench Dedication

Goodwin was proud to present Mr. John Carson with a surprise to celebrate his 70th birthday. John is the owner’s rep for the gardens, and was deeply involved with the construction of the Eleanor and Nicholas Chabraja Visitor’s Interpretive Center (Goodwin milled 20,000 linear feet of River-Recovered® Heart Cypress for siding and trim for the project.)

Naples Botanical Gardens commissioned Goodwin to build a bench – dedicated to John – for the gardens. Jeffrey Forbes and Dan Peterson crafted the River-Recovered® Antique Heart Cypress Select bench by hand. Here are the pictures of its evolution: Read more

“Heart Cypress – The Wood Eternal”, the Southern Cypress Manufacturer’s Assn, 1936

“Heart Cypress – The Wood Eternal”, the Southern Cypress Manufacturer’s Assn, 1936“One of the most picturesque trees of the American forest is the full-grown cypress. It is slow growing tree, and reaches its best development in tidewater swamplands. Trees well over a thousand years old, towering to heights of over a hundred feet, were common in virgin stands. The mature cypress develops a swelled butt of 8 to 10 feet in diameter and is surrounded by so-called knees, which are really offshoots of the root. It is believed they serve the double purpose of respiratory organs and anchorage.”

American Bald Cypress grows in a belt along the southeastern coastal plain, mainly along rivers and swampy areas. Much of the finest and largest cypress timber grew where the land was submerged most of the year. Horses and mules could not work under such conditions and machine equipment was impractical. An early solution to the problem of making these stands accessible was to build canals through the swamps, so that large pullboats could drag the cypress logs out where they could be made into rafts and towed to the mill.

Preliminary to logging the cypress forests of the 1800’s, the trees to be felled were marked and girdled a year, or several months an advance. Girdling was done by cutting a notch three inches deep around the circumference of the trunk and about three feet above the ground with an ax. Thus, the tree was killed and the wood was allowed to lose part of the moisture, so that when it was cut, the logs would float.

Today, all the millennium giants are felled and gone. Second growth cypress is almost like a different specie. Minus the saturation of cypressein oil that takes several hundred years to develop, second growth cannot stand up to the elements like the virgin growth tree you see here.

“Heart Cypress – The Wood Eternal”, the Southern Cypress Manufacturer’s Assn, 1936But there is some good news! Goodwin has stores of this beautiful, durable antique wood in many grades.

See the table being made by Michael Doerr for his brother the owner of Auteur Winery (photo at right).