American Institute of Architects (AIA) Convention Re-Cap

Goodwin had a wonderful time making new friends and seeing old ones at the 2017 AIA Convention in Orlando, Florida.  We were pleased to exhibit alongside numerous luxury and high end manufacturers, all showing off the latest architectural products and design trends.  It was refreshing to see just how popular antique wood is in contemporary design. More and more architects are specifying wood for projects outside the scope of historical renovation.  In fact, reclaimed wood kitchen floors, cypress wood walls and antique wood paneling were some of the hottest 2017 contemporary design trends featured at the convention.

For those of you who could not be there, our Marketing Manager, Jeffrey Forbes, produced this video to give you an inside look at the convention. Enjoy!

Expo

Wood Ceiling

Calling All Architects and Designers!

We invite you to join Goodwin at the upcoming National Wood Flooring Association Expo at the Phoenix Convention Center:

  • Wednesday, April 12th 11:30am – 5:30pm
  • Thursday, April 13th 10:45am – 3:45pm

Visit Goodwin Company (Booth 923) and receive a free flash drive with two free CEUs for AIA and IDCEC.

We will also be conducting live ten minute demonstrations illustrating the ease of installing heart cypress walls and paneling.

As you know, antique heart pine and heart cypress is trending in contemporary design. This gorgeous wood adds depth and warmth to any home or office space. We have a team ready to help you choose the best species and finishes for your designs. Come see samples and learn about Goodwin’s proprietary finishes which have been formulated specifically for resinous qualities of antique wood:

  • Zero to very low volatile compounds
  • Second in hardness only to diamonds
  • Customizable to fit your specific design needs
  • Child, pet and environmentally friendly

We hope to see you in Phoenix!

Naturally Modern

If you’re the mom who had the fewest hours of sleep this week, the employee working the longest shift, or are the business person with the craziest schedule, you’ve won the silent contest nagging all of us.  It seems that somewhere along the way, we’ve started glorifying busyness.  If we could take an honest look at our lives, I think we could agree this cycle is pointless. As a result of trying to cope with this constant state of exhaustion, we have turned towards modern design in our space. Its simplicity and functionality seems to appeal to the hectic lifestyles we have created for ourselves.

Simplicity.

When you hear the words modern design, images of steel pipes, concrete structures, open spaces, and smooth surfaces may come to mind.  Maybe you pictured a geometric chair in an otherwise relatively vacant space.

But modern design is much more than these extreme images—it strives to seamlessly transition the simplicity of nature into man-built space. Without explicitly natural elements, these spaces seem to fall short.  Wood tends to get forgotten in modern design, dismissed as traditional or stuffy.  But the simplicity of wood is innate and timeless.  It stands alone, bringing the simplicity of nature to any modern space.

Functionality.

What does it do?  Because wood is innately simple and beautiful, it has the ability to perform both functionally and artistically in a space.  Whether its edges are left rough as a tabletop or sanded smooth for flooring or paneling, wood is a diverse material that lends itself to a variety of applications.  Without the use of wood, modern design is vulnerable to creating useful spaces that are unlivable.  But wood brings a certain kind of softness, as Kinfolk’s Tina Minami Dhingra described, without forfeiting beauty, function, or simplicity.[1]

Goodwin’s wood bar top at Swamp Head brewery in Gainesville, Florida shows the practicality and beauty of heart wood in modern spaces.  The unique cuts of the wood bring an artistic yet functional appeal to the brewery, warming up the space making it a more conversational and livable environment.  This natural element is at home even among more traditional modern materials like the metal stools and concrete floors—proving the products versatility, integrating interior and exterior space while exemplifying responsible use of nature’s resources and bringing beauty to a space through a material once thought lost.[1]

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Lauren ColeyGuest Post by Lauren Corley

Lauren Corley is a guest author for Goodwin and is a senior in the Innovation Academy at the University of Florida studying Sustainability in the Built Environment with a minor in Innovation. She began her involvement with Goodwin at the 2015 Greenbuild conference in Washington D.C. She is from the Panhandle of Florida and gained an interest for sustainability and its use in space as a high school student. Since moving to Gainesville she has interned for the Repurpose Project as well as the Alachua County Public Schools under the Energy Conservation Specialist.

Sources: Sparke, Penny. “The Modern Interior Revisited.” Journal of Interior Design 34.1 (2008): V-Xii. Web.

[1] “THE KINFOLK HOME TOURS: THE SELF-MADE MODERNIST – Kinfolk.” Kinfolk. N.p., 2014. Web. 19 Aug. 2016.

 

A Search for Quality

When did we stop reaching for the most inexpensive item on the shelf at the grocery store? When did grabbing a carton of milk or eggs on our way home from work become result of a series of ethical decisions?  A few years ago, I would have scanned the refrigerated section of the grocery for the least expensive carton of eggs, put them in my cart, then moved on to the next item on my grocery list — 2% milk with the latest expiration date.

But recently, I have noticed myself analyzing my purchases with greater detail before I make a purchase. A quick Google search led me to a list of all the varieties of eggs sold at my local supermarket: organic, free-range, naturally pasteurized, vegetarian, and the list goes on. In choosing the type of eggs I want to buy, I also have to consider the packaging of the eggs. If I buy the plastic carton, it will hold up long enough to be reused when my roommate brings eggs home from her coworker’s farm. But if I buy the paper carton, it will recycle most easily and doesn’t require any plastic.

Why did such a small task begin to involve so many decisions? I think it is a result of our increased demand for quality. We have all heard that ignorance is bliss, but with limitless information at our fingertips, we can no longer claim ignorance. As a result, our culture is becoming more ethically concerned. This means we are looking for products that meet our needs, but we also want to spend our money investing in the local economy, and caring for the environment. Maybe this is why the millennial generation has also been called the “civic generation”—a name earned by our desire to care for place—the environment in which we invest our lives.[1] We crave uncomplicated quality and authenticity in our spaces.

I have found that nothing brings these elements to a space as effortlessly as nature itself. Natural light, plants, or even an earthy color palette can bring the simplicity and life we crave in our spaces. But nothing has the same transformative impact as wood. It brings the outdoors in while contributing a durability and livability unique to the material. As a product of nature, it does not try to mimic the life we wish to find in our spaces but exposes the authenticity and history innate to the material. We see this in the pictures below that show the transformation that Goodwin’s heart pine LEGACY®  floors had on the historic Firestone building in downtown Gainesville, Florida.

The tongue and groove flooring in this room are building recovered, meaning they were once beams in 19th century industrial buildings in the U.S. The reuse of this wood speaks to its strength as well as the sustainability of the product. A room long forgotten and left lifeless is now a hidden gem in the city…and it’s available for lease starting November 2016!

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Lauren ColeyGuest Post by Lauren Corley

Lauren Corley is a guest author for Goodwin and is a senior in the Innovation Academy at the University of Florida studying Sustainability in the Built Environment with a minor in Innovation. She began her involvement with Goodwin at the 2015 Greenbuild conference in Washington D.C. She is from the Panhandle of Florida and gained an interest for sustainability and its use in space as a high school student. Since moving to Gainesville she has interned for the Repurpose Project as well as the Alachua County Public Schools under the Energy Conservation Specialist.

[1] Morley Winograd, and Michael D. Hais. Millenial Momentum: How a Generation Is Remaking America. New Brunswick, New Jersey, and London: Rutgers UP. Web. 10 Apr. 2016.

Old Florida Longleaf Heartpine – How the Old Becomes New

This year the old Melting Pot building in Gainesville, Florida will become home to the Matheson History Museum’s Library and Archives. Constructed in 1933, this building was originally the Gainesville Gospel Tabernacle and later became the Barrow Family Antique Store before it was most recently The Melting Pot Fondue restaurant. The building’s interior is being finished with the Goodwin Company’s Old Florida longleaf heart pine flooring reclaimed from old growth hurricane damaged forests. Harvesting these damaged trees does not contribute to deforestation and still produces a wood similar in hardness to Red Oak. Goodwin’s flooring, laced with red toned growth rings, complement the building’s original ceiling beams, contributing to the authenticity and aesthetic of this historic Gainesville building. The Matheson received private donations and a $300,000 grant from the Florida Department of State’s Division of Historical Resources to help finance this adaptive reuse project, which was completed by Joyner Construction, Jay Reeves Associates, and Rudy Ditmar of Rudy’s Professional floor sanding. We can’t wait to see this restoration finished and for the building to once again become a gathering place in our community!

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Lauren ColeyGuest Post by Lauren Corley

Lauren Corley is a guest author for Goodwin and is a senior in the Innovation Academy at the University of Florida studying Sustainability in the Built Environment with a minor in Innovation. She began her involvement with Goodwin at the 2015 Greenbuild conference in Washington D.C. She is from the Panhandle of Florida and gained an interest for sustainability and its use in space as a high school student. Since moving to Gainesville she has interned for the Repurpose Project as well as the Alachua County Public Schools under the Energy Conservation Specialist.