A Visit From a Friend…

GatorWe recently captured this photo of an alligator camping out in our log pond. This reminds me of the reason why the term “deadhead logging” was coined. As you can see, the small ends of the sunken logs float, resembling heads. It is difficult to distinguish the logs from the alligator!

Speaking of deadhead logging, did you know George Goodwin was the pioneer of the Florida Deadhead Logging permit? This environmental permit specifies and monitors how the logs are to be recovered to ensure preservation of the underwater habitat. George traveled to the state capitol on numerous occasions to garner support from environment groups and government agencies, ultimately partnering with Florida’s Department of Submerged Lands and a host of environmental organizations to develop what is now known as Florida’s Deadhead River Logging Permit.

Take comfort in knowing that not only does Goodwin take great care in recovering our logs, but we spearheaded efforts to ensure anyone who chooses to do the same does so in a manner which is environmentally responsible and protects our precious underwater habitats.


Interested in what this permit entails? Visit:
http://www.dep.state.fl.us/water/wetlands/erp/deadhead.htm

The Menil Collection

You can find Goodwin wood everywhere!  The 2013 National AIA (American Institute of Architects) Twenty-five Year Award winner is the Menil Collection in Houston, Texas.  Goodwin was proud to provide over 36,000 LF of Vertical Clear Heart Cypress to replace the deteriorating second-growth originally used in the structure.  Jim McReynolds of McReynolds Architects of Houston […]

Restoring a Wright Masterpiece

We all know the damage hurricanes can cause. While any devastation is tragic, it is especially disheartening when a historical site suffers extreme destruction. Such was the case with the Charnley-Norwood House in Mississippi, which sustained excessive damage during Hurricane Katrina. Chicago lumber-baron James Charnley commissioned two of America’s most famed architects, Louis Sullivan and Frank Lloyd Wright, to design his prominent vacation residence. This iconic 1890s masterpiece is said to exemplify a watershed in residential design that re-shaped 20th century residential architecture.

Every effort needed to be taken to restore this important part of architectural and American history. Esteemed Architect Larry Albert of Hattiesburg, MS took on the challenge of reconstructing this Sullivan-Wright masterpiece. You can imagine the excitement and honor we felt when we discovered Mr. Albert specified Goodwin’s Curly Heart Pine Paneling (with a custom V-Joint profile) for this very important project. Recreating and restoring a masterpiece is quite challenging, and Goodwin worked hand-in-hand with the entire building design team from start to finish.

recommended feed 001If you look closely in this photo, you can see the alternating sap and heart boards of curly in this cabinet. This is the nature of curly since it is often all sapwood, comprised of outer boards of only one (1) out of every 500 or so logs.

It was initially thought that the flooring in the home was not original because it had a back relief. We were able to demonstrate to the building design team that 125 years ago, they did kerf the backs to save on transportation cost. Wood flooring was simply very expensive to ship back then. There was also waxy paper under the original floor. We encouraged them to consider using Aquabar “B” by Fortifiber, one of several products with a bituminous layer between two layers of kraft paper. These products slow down the moisture movement from the crawl spaces where hot humid air cools off and introduces moisture into the flooring. Roofing felt does nothing to stop moisture movement and plastic traps it. Aquabar “B” has a permeance rating between the felt and the plastic. This prevents moisture from moving quickly and minimizes the possibility of cupping.

Greg Bingham of Ocean Springs Lumber visited the site with me. Ocean Springs Lumber also provided materials for this project.

Curly Heart Pine can be used in a variety of residential, historical and corporate settings. Call Goodwin today to discuss ways this beautiful wood can add distinction and character to your home, office or preservation project.

 

More about the Charnley-Norwood House:

Flowers Underfoot!

WikimediaThis awe-inspiring creation is called the Carpet of Flowers – each year, thousands gather at the Grand-Place in Brussels to catch a glimpse of an amazing feat of artistry and ingenuity. Production of the carpet, which is comprised of approximately 750,000 flowers, begins one-year in advance with projects and scale models. The actual number of […]