Reclaimed Wood Kitchen Floors Blend Perfectly with Contemporary Accents

We are proud to show off the beautiful kitchen in the home of our good friend and client, Maureen Stafford.  Maureen is a preservationist and past president of the Old Northeast Neighborhood Association in St. Petersburg, Florida.  Goodwin milled 1020 square feet of Legacy building reclaimed heart pine select and vertical flooring to help with her restoration project.

We absolutely adore her gorgeous reclaimed wood kitchen floors.  Just look at how the antique wood perfectly blends with the contemporary countertops, appliances and accents:

People often ask if antique wood is suitable for kitchens and the answer is, “YES!” In fact, most people who install reclaimed wood kitchen floors say they will never go back to having any other type of flooring in their kitchen, period. Goodwin’s new proprietary finishes formulated exclusively for resinous reclaimed and River-Recovered® antique wood are perfect for wood floors in your kitchen. The Diamond finish is second in hardness only to diamonds, making it suitable for high traffic areas, kids and pets. Oh, and all of our finishes are environmentally friendly, too.

Interested in learning more about how reclaimed wood kitchen floors can breathe new life into your home? Give us a call, we are here to help!

Contemporary Application of Building Reclaimed Longleaf Pine

Goodwin was proud to be part of the Nimbus building project in Gainesville, Florida.  We milled pine beams from an old depot building that was previously on the site to create gorgeous building reclaimed longleaf pine walls. Take a look:

River-Recovered® and reclaimed wood is perfect for energy efficient buildings such as Nimbus, as antique wood is an excellent insulator. And, let’s not forget to mention that it perfectly complements and warms up any modern space.  There are many contemporary uses for antique longleaf pine. Contact us to explore how this beautiful wood can make over your home or office.

Preserving the Past by Educating Our Future

Graduate Students Visit Goodwin for a Lesson in Reclaimed Wood

Goodwin Company is located just outside of Payne’s Prairie Preserve and within close proximity of the University of Florida (UF) campus.  This presents an opportunity for us to actively participate in education and environmental responsibility. Goodwin has partnered with UF to incorporate our antique wood into their contemporary, sustainable design projects, including:

  • The Dasburg House, home of Dr. Kent Fuchs, university president. This project featured Goodwin’s River-Recovered® Vertical Heart Pine, Legacy (building reclaimed) Vertical Heart Pine and Curly Heart Pine
  • The Otis Hawkins Center for UF athletes, which features 10,000 square feet of sustainable River-Recovered® Heart Pine ceiling and paneling.
  • The Periplanómenos Whistles featured on campus and handcrafted using Goodwin’s sinker cypress.

Last year, Goodwin had another opportunity to partner with UF.  We hosted graduate students from the school’s architecture program.  Jeffrey Forbes taught them about the history of Goodwin’s antique woods and our manufacturing process.  He also discussed the benefits of specifying Goodwin’s River-Recovered® and building reclaimed antique heart pine and heart cypress, especially in sustainable design. We believe we have an obligation to introduce students to reclaimed wood while emphasizing the importance of designing with sustainably sourced building materials. Through interactions with upcoming architects and designers, we hope to impact the future to reflect the craftsmanship and resiliency of our past.

Enjoy this short video highlighting their visit.

Naturally Modern

If you’re the mom who had the fewest hours of sleep this week, the employee working the longest shift, or are the business person with the craziest schedule, you’ve won the silent contest nagging all of us.  It seems that somewhere along the way, we’ve started glorifying busyness.  If we could take an honest look at our lives, I think we could agree this cycle is pointless. As a result of trying to cope with this constant state of exhaustion, we have turned towards modern design in our space. Its simplicity and functionality seems to appeal to the hectic lifestyles we have created for ourselves.

Simplicity.

When you hear the words modern design, images of steel pipes, concrete structures, open spaces, and smooth surfaces may come to mind.  Maybe you pictured a geometric chair in an otherwise relatively vacant space.

But modern design is much more than these extreme images—it strives to seamlessly transition the simplicity of nature into man-built space. Without explicitly natural elements, these spaces seem to fall short.  Wood tends to get forgotten in modern design, dismissed as traditional or stuffy.  But the simplicity of wood is innate and timeless.  It stands alone, bringing the simplicity of nature to any modern space.

Functionality.

What does it do?  Because wood is innately simple and beautiful, it has the ability to perform both functionally and artistically in a space.  Whether its edges are left rough as a tabletop or sanded smooth for flooring or paneling, wood is a diverse material that lends itself to a variety of applications.  Without the use of wood, modern design is vulnerable to creating useful spaces that are unlivable.  But wood brings a certain kind of softness, as Kinfolk’s Tina Minami Dhingra described, without forfeiting beauty, function, or simplicity.[1]

Goodwin’s wood bar top at Swamp Head brewery in Gainesville, Florida shows the practicality and beauty of heart wood in modern spaces.  The unique cuts of the wood bring an artistic yet functional appeal to the brewery, warming up the space making it a more conversational and livable environment.  This natural element is at home even among more traditional modern materials like the metal stools and concrete floors—proving the products versatility, integrating interior and exterior space while exemplifying responsible use of nature’s resources and bringing beauty to a space through a material once thought lost.[1]

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Lauren ColeyGuest Post by Lauren Corley

Lauren Corley is a guest author for Goodwin and is a senior in the Innovation Academy at the University of Florida studying Sustainability in the Built Environment with a minor in Innovation. She began her involvement with Goodwin at the 2015 Greenbuild conference in Washington D.C. She is from the Panhandle of Florida and gained an interest for sustainability and its use in space as a high school student. Since moving to Gainesville she has interned for the Repurpose Project as well as the Alachua County Public Schools under the Energy Conservation Specialist.

Sources: Sparke, Penny. “The Modern Interior Revisited.” Journal of Interior Design 34.1 (2008): V-Xii. Web.

[1] “THE KINFOLK HOME TOURS: THE SELF-MADE MODERNIST – Kinfolk.” Kinfolk. N.p., 2014. Web. 19 Aug. 2016.

 

Pop-A-Top

We were so excited to visit the new Pop-A-Top General Store at Depot Park. Goodwin’s Legacy heart pine floors and wall paneling make the old depot look as it did when it was first built in 1859[1]. Once a gathering place for travelers, the old train depot is now a community space again—but this time it is a congregation area for those who want to kick back and stay a while.  Park-goers can even stop in for a cool drink in a nostalgic atmosphere.

Goodwin is proud to have been a part of this renovation project. We provided our Legacy heart pine flooring back in 2012. Now, with the opening of the park, we have seen the space come alive. We love this type of project because it is both sustainable design and historic restoration through and through. At Goodwin, we get to see forgotten, antique wood brought to life each day. We understand the value of our history and its integral role in shaping our future.

 

Lauren ColeyGuest Post by Lauren Corley

Lauren Corley is a guest author for Goodwin and is a senior in the Innovation Academy at the University of Florida studying Sustainability in the Built Environment with a minor in Innovation. She began her involvement with Goodwin at the 2015 Greenbuild conference in Washington D.C. She is from the Panhandle of Florida and gained an interest for sustainability and its use in space as a high school student. Since moving to Gainesville she has interned for the Repurpose Project as well as the Alachua County Public Schools under the Energy Conservation Specialist.

[1] https://www.theclio.com/web/entry?id=21025

Old Florida Longleaf Heartpine – How the Old Becomes New

This year the old Melting Pot building in Gainesville, Florida will become home to the Matheson History Museum’s Library and Archives. Constructed in 1933, this building was originally the Gainesville Gospel Tabernacle and later became the Barrow Family Antique Store before it was most recently The Melting Pot Fondue restaurant. The building’s interior is being finished with the Goodwin Company’s Old Florida longleaf heart pine flooring reclaimed from old growth hurricane damaged forests. Harvesting these damaged trees does not contribute to deforestation and still produces a wood similar in hardness to Red Oak. Goodwin’s flooring, laced with red toned growth rings, complement the building’s original ceiling beams, contributing to the authenticity and aesthetic of this historic Gainesville building. The Matheson received private donations and a $300,000 grant from the Florida Department of State’s Division of Historical Resources to help finance this adaptive reuse project, which was completed by Joyner Construction, Jay Reeves Associates, and Rudy Ditmar of Rudy’s Professional floor sanding. We can’t wait to see this restoration finished and for the building to once again become a gathering place in our community!

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Lauren ColeyGuest Post by Lauren Corley

Lauren Corley is a guest author for Goodwin and is a senior in the Innovation Academy at the University of Florida studying Sustainability in the Built Environment with a minor in Innovation. She began her involvement with Goodwin at the 2015 Greenbuild conference in Washington D.C. She is from the Panhandle of Florida and gained an interest for sustainability and its use in space as a high school student. Since moving to Gainesville she has interned for the Repurpose Project as well as the Alachua County Public Schools under the Energy Conservation Specialist.

Dreams Do Come True… Sometimes They Are Just a Long Time in the Making!

Several years ago, we noticed an increase in the demand for pre-finished wood flooring.  So, we set out to find someone who was considered the best of the best in the industry to work with us.  It took three years before Dan Petersen appeared at our door after being introduced to us by a colleague. Dan is one of the best pre-finished wood experts in the business, as evidenced by the specially formulated finishes he has developed specifically for Goodwin.  Dan is talented and can provide the hardest finish on the market, produce any custom color unique to you and incorporate textures that look great on reclaimed wood.  Not to mention he is one of the smartest and nicest people you will ever meet! Dan operates Heritage Wood Finish Company here at Goodwin.

Finding Dan was only the first step.  Next, we needed a new building.  We drew up plans and applied to the County Growth Management office for a building permit for a factory finish facility. The County initially denied our request.  Today – after three more years of engineering, environmental and legal studies – we are very close to finally having our building.

As you can see, the turtles in our log pond are just as anxious as we are for it to be complete!

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Goodwin is one of the most fortunate companies, as we have been doing what we love for over 40 years. George Goodwin started pulling and sawing River-Recovered® logs in the mid-seventies and today he is still the company sawyer. He could hardly be happier!

Thank you, George, for an incredible 40 years. Here’s to our wildest successes yet to come!

The Goodwin Difference… Together, We Are as Strong as Our Wood!

  • Original River-Recovered® heart pine and heart cypress specialists
  • First reclaimed engineered floor “Made in the USA” right here at our mill
  • Environmentally, kid and pet friendly factory finishes, custom color and textures
  • Oldest family-owned and operated reclaimed wood company in the United States
  • River-Recovered and reclaimed flooring, paneling, siding, stair parts, moldings and lumber, solid/engineered, finished / unfinished

Please enjoy these photos of our new building – we are almost there!

Sinker Cypress – The Gentle Giants of the South Part Two

After the Civil War and during reconstruction, things were chaotic in the south.  There was an abundance of cheap land, much of which was bought up by northern lumber and timber interest who needed a new source. The easiest way to access the longleaf pines near rivers was to cut through the bald cypress and create a road that led to them. Loggers then went to great lengths to girdle the trees in hopes of decreasing their weight in preparation to float them down river to sawmills. They would also use man-made auger holes to place a pole between one tree which had been girdled and one which had not to float them down the river. Sometimes this technique would work. However, when this strategy failed, trees would sink to the bottom and be lost.  These are the trees we recover and transform into our beautiful antique heart pine and heart cypress wood flooring, paneling and ceilings.

As you can see, there is much, much more to sinker cypress than meets the eye.  Enjoy part two of Sinker Cypress – The Gentle Giants of the South:

An Honest Comparison of Laminate vs. Wood

Many companies – including those who claim to produce high-end reclaimed wood flooring – have decided to re-direct some of their efforts into manufacturing what is marketed as high end laminate flooring. Goodwin will never venture into this market for several reasons.  While we prefer to stick with sustainable, durable, high-quality antique wood flooring, we are often asked the differences between wood and laminate.  This letter from a homeowner converting from laminate to real wood was published by Hardwood Floors.  It does an excellent job of explaining the differences from someone who knows first-hand:

Laminate cannot replace true wood, and there is no wood that is richer, more beautiful and of as high of quality as River-Recovered® or reclaimed heart pine and sinker cypress.  Compare a sample of our wood against any other finished wood in the world and you will clearly see why Goodwin is the industry gold standard.