An Honest Comparison of Laminate vs. Wood

Many companies – including those who claim to produce high-end reclaimed wood flooring – have decided to re-direct some of their efforts into manufacturing what is marketed as high end laminate flooring. Goodwin will never venture into this market for several reasons.  While we prefer to stick with sustainable, durable, high-quality antique wood flooring, we are often asked the differences between wood and laminate.  This letter from a homeowner converting from laminate to real wood was published by Hardwood Floors.  It does an excellent job of explaining the differences from someone who knows first-hand:

Laminate cannot replace true wood, and there is no wood that is richer, more beautiful and of as high of quality as River-Recovered® or reclaimed heart pine and sinker cypress.  Compare a sample of our wood against any other finished wood in the world and you will clearly see why Goodwin is the industry gold standard.

To Bevel or Not to Bevel!

On A Factory Finished Wood Floor That Is…

Here is an article by Andrew St. James, Goodwin’s Technical Consultant:

After years of observing the performance of factory finished wood floors the micro-bevel has emerged as the standard side profile for prefinished flooring. Some building owners prefer the look of square edge flooring, but it is more difficult to achieve good results with square edge prefinished wood floor.

Installation of a square edge factory finished floor demands better jobsite conditions in addition to more skill and care in the installation process. If a square edge is raised slightly higher than the adjacent board not only is there a visual problem, the potential for later damage is increased. Here are some suggestions to help improve your outcome if you choose a square edge factory finished floor:

  • The subfloor must be precisely flat to assure alignment of adjacent boards. This requires more care to achieve variation less than 3/16” out in 10 feet or 1/8” in a 6-foot radius that is normally allowed.
  • Nailing must be precise and with even pressure to avoid exposed square edges. The elastic nature of wood allows deflection if some boards are pulled down too much (or too little) when nailing. When nails are not set evenly the result can be similar to that seen with subfloor irregularities.
  • Minor seasonal cupping caused by the growth ring structure is normal in solid wood.  Boards change size and shape slightly. This slight movement is more noticeable in a square edge factory finished product.

Goodwin’s micro-bevel starts at twenty thousandths of an inch and is less after sanding and finishing. The tongue and groove help maintain alignment of the board ends. This stabilizing effect combined with the better strength properties of the end grain of the boards minimizes the need to bevel the ends.

Please send us your feedback on this short summary of Pros and Cons on To Bevel or Not To Bevel!

Beveled Edge

Goodwin’s Antique Longleaf Stained Brown Micro Beveled Edge

Goodwin’s Antique Longleaf Stained Brown Micro Beveled Edge

Pros

  • Can be very slight
  • Minimizes noticeability of misalignment
  • Normal subfloor variance within industry standards is allowed

Cons

  • Concern of dust in the groove
  • Slight line visible between boards

Square Edge

  • Suitable for an onsite finish
  • Matches existing historic flooring
  • Avoids a slight line between boards
  • Subfloor requires more care to make precisely flat
  • More skill needed to nail precisely, with even pressure
  • Any over / under increases the potential for finish failure
  • Slight movement from seasonal changes is more noticeable

Restoring a Biscayne Park Beauty

Goodwin was proud to be part of another historic renovation.  This time, we provided our River-Recovered® Heart Pine CHARACTER to help restore a 1900s log cabin which once served as the village of Biscayne Park’s “meeting spot”. According to an article in the Miami Herald“The log cabin was built in 1933 as a way to give laborers some work during the Depression.  It cost $247 and used about 140 feet of lumber, according to state records.”

The cabin was expanded through the years to house police and village employees.  However, when it was designated a historic site by the Miami-Dade County Preservation Board, officials pursued constructing a new village hall so they could return the log cabin back to its original state.

And, that is where Goodwin’s reclaimed wood came into play.  An antique cabin needs an antique reclaimed wood floor, so when we got the call for 1100 sq. ft., we were happy to oblige!  The restored cabin – which now serves as the village commission chambers – officially re-opened last month. Richard Heisenbottle was the restoration architect and McKenzie Construction was the contractor.

Read the recent article in the Miami Herald

An Antique Twist to Modern Look

Do you love the look of reclaimed wood but prefer a modern style living or work area?  Central Hardwoods of Dallas, Texas achieved both in this sleek office space:

Central Hardwoods used Goodwin’s River-Recovered® and reclaimed wood paneling – antique longleaf to be specific – which resulted in this classy, antique twist on a modern look.  If you love it and gotta have it, give us a call!