Historic Service Station Transformed by Renovation

Antique Reclaimed Wood Serves as Centerpiece of Firestone Office Building’s New Look

(Circa 1929)

(Gainesville, FL) – Great architecture stands forever, which is why Phoebe Cade Miles (daughter of the late Dr. James Robert Cade, inventor of Gatorade) and her husband Richard – owners of the old Firestone building in Gainesville, Florida – chose to install antique River-Recovered® and Legacy Heartpine flooring during their recent renovation. The building, which also houses University of Florida’s Gator Lab and Starter Space, features 4,000 sq. ft. of office space (two stories), a reception area, inside second floor balcony and a completely renovated and remodeled interior. The building itself was constructed using Campville Brick, another material with a unique story and history.

The hallmark of the newly remodeled space is the River-Recovered® and reclaimed Legacy Vertical Heartpine provided by Goodwin Company, which surrounds a rectangle of brilliantly positioned reclaimed pine from the original building and an inlay of a fan medallion in the center. Boston native Rudy Dittmar performed the installation.

“We could not have created this incredible space without the help of Goodwin Company,” explains Miles. “They provided the antique heartpine flooring we needed to complement the original flooring. We were able to save some of the original flooring and with their help, were able to create an amazing design that worked both old and new into a work of beauty.”

“Restoring and renovating historic spaces is one of our passions,” says Carol Goodwin, President of Goodwin Company. “Words cannot describe the feeling of witnessing your product breathe new life into a building with such deep roots and history. Antique wood is really the only option when you want to preserve the rich history and appeal.”

 

Photo Credit: Front Street Commercial Real Estate Group

About Goodwin Company

Founded in 1976, Goodwin Company is the building design industry’s trusted partner and preferred resource for fine antique reclaimed and River-Recovered® wood flooring. Esteemed architects, designers and builders specify Goodwin’s products for use in luxury residential homes, historical renovations and commercial projects including corporate office buildings, universities, libraries and high-end retail establishments.  Prominent work includes: This Old House corporate offices, private residences of Bob Villa, Paul McCartney, Frank Lloyd Wright and Ted Turner, Weyland Art Gallery, Brownwood at The Villages, the Charnley-Norwood House and the Texas Governor’s Mansion.  For more information, visit www.heartpine.com.

How to Remove a Wax Finish and Recoat with Water-Based Poly

It’s always heartwarming to be able to help a client who purchased a floor from us over 20 years ago. George and Cyndi Watkins wanted to take the wax finish off their River Recovered® Heart Pine floors, then stain and coat them with a water-based polyurethane. The Watkins are discerning clients who know what they […]

Installing Wood Floors – It’s Not an Expense, It’s an Investment!

We sometimes deal with potential customers who are debating between installing our wood flooring, or using an inferior product.  Sometimes the cost of our flooring is a bit higher than other options.  However, the durability, longevity, and alluring beauty of our woods cannot be ignored.  And, with proper upkeep (which amounts to regular sweeping and […]

Goodwin Company Featured on ABC “Made in America” Series

Special thank you to Emily Burris and the ABC TV 20 (WCJB) team for featuring Goodwin Company for their “Made in America” series. Check it out:

The Menil Collection

You can find Goodwin wood everywhere!  The 2013 National AIA (American Institute of Architects) Twenty-five Year Award winner is the Menil Collection in Houston, Texas.  Goodwin was proud to provide over 36,000 LF of Vertical Clear Heart Cypress to replace the deteriorating second-growth originally used in the structure.  Jim McReynolds of McReynolds Architects of Houston […]

Aren’t Wood Floors Difficult to Clean?

One of the many myths about wood floors is that they are difficult to clean and maintain. That may have been true long ago, but now, with the high quality finishes available, wood floor upkeep is quite simple. In fact, it is no more laborious than cleaning any other type of flooring surface. Many people […]

Taking the Stress Out of Distressed Flooring

Pros and Cons of Choosing This Rustic Option

Goodwin receives numerous requests for distressed flooring. We achieve this more “rustic” look by using various staining, scraping and contouring techniques on our already beautifully aged antique woods.  Some companies scrape newer woods to achieve this look, but Goodwin guarantees all of our solid flooring is at least 200-500 years old.

Goodwin’s Chief Operating Officer, Andrew St. James, discusses the advantages and disadvantages of choosing a distressed wood floor:

Advantages:

  • A well-made, precisely handcrafted distressed wood floor adds ambiance to any room of the house.
  • Distressed products are handcrafted to achieve a variety of interesting looks.
  • A lower grade of wood can be used, translating to some cost savings.
  • Genuine antique products (such as the wood used in Goodwin’s distressed flooring) possess a quality that is just not obtainable with newer wood products.

Read more

Acclimation Anxiety!

We are often posed with the question of how certain woods will adapt to a particular environment.  Climate change can present a challenge; however, a qualified installer will have no problem ensuring proper acclimation.  Our COO, Andrew St. James, Ph.D, is happy to explain:

“In the past, various time schedules have been the accepted standard for acclimation.  This included acclimation time onsite, and, at one point, there was even a specification for a certain amount of time in the general geographic area prior to installation.

Current best practice is to ensure the installation site, including subfloor, is at the correct moisture condition prior to your flooring delivery. Once you receive your flooring, measure several representative pieces of wood.  Proceed only when the wood has reached a moisture content near that which it will have during service.”

Are you an installer who would like to learn more about acclimation?  Feel free to contact us and we will be happy to discuss this with you further.  We also plan to offer National Wood Flooring Association (NWFA) installation classes and a NWFA finish certifier test this year. We would love for you to become one of our esteemed installation professionals!

Reclaimed Wood Flooring… 5 Things to Learn in 5 Minutes

The following tips have links if you want more detail. Or call and talk with our in-house technical expert, Andrew St. James.

1. Help in choosing a reclaimed wood floor…

Begin with a few choices:
· Do you want a unique floor with a story?
· Light, medium or dark? Consistent or color variation?
· Pin stripes, bold arches or subtle graining?
· Single or random widths?
· ‘Character’, pristine or in between?
· How about knots or do you want ‘clear’?
Maybe you just want to see a few of these characteristics in River Recovered Heart PineLegacy Heart PineRiver Recovered Heart Cypress… or Sustainably Harvested Woods.

Antique Heart Pine is the most frequently specified reclaimed wood.’Virgin growth’ heart pine, the ‘wood that built America’. is all heartwood, very hard and comes in many grades.

Some of the more commonly available reclaimed woods include: American Chestnut, Heart Cypress, Douglas Fir, Eastern White Pine and Oak.

2. Which finish should you use on reclaimed wood?

The finish you choose can dramatically change the look of your floor. While most reclaimed wood is sanded and finished smooth to the touch, you can have a distressed floor. Distressing simulates old, old floors or barn siding and is usually done on milling machines, though it can also be done onsite by craftsmen.

How you want to maintain your wood floor determines if you want polyurethane that requires a professional to repair or if you want an oil finish that you can refresh when scratches occur. The oil finishes are very natural and low sheen; however, they can be made to have degrees of shine. They are especially appropriate for heavy traffic and come with easy maintenance products.

3. Would solid or engineered reclaimed wood work best for you?

Engineered wood is a growing market. Goodwin began engineered flooring to help conserve the rare River Recovered® wood. While solid wood floor may remain the ‘gold standard’ for those who can accommodate its greater demands, now you can have ‘USA made’ engineered flooring that looks and lasts like solid and is easier to fit into the construction cycle.

4. Not all reclaimed wood is equal…

To consistently manufacture a well made reclaimed wood floor that is properly kiln-dried, precisely milled, graded to established standards and backed by in-house technical expertise requires a considerable investment. Reclaimed wood can be a confusing niche. You may want to know some terminology when specifying antique heart pine. Building design professionals may want our free continuing education course on Architectural and Design Uses of Reclaimed Wood.

5. Installation tips to help your reclaimed wood perform well for a lifetime and beyond.

Once you have chosen your floor, what about installation? How to select a wood floor professional, even tips on existing subfloors are on our blogs. It is possible to get any stair parts or millwork in the same grade as your floor.

Engineered floor installation, when glued to concrete, needs to have an elastomeric type adhesive made for engineered wood. We generally suggest a vapor retarder over the slab. Even if the slab is dry now a seal coat ensures against future leaks or storms.

Just a few of the important tips to help ensure your solid wood floor installation:
1. The sub floor needs to be flat and level to within 3/16” over 10 feet for nail down or flat within 1/8” over 6 feet for glue down installation.
2. The moisture content of the wood floor and the sub-floor need to match the expected indoor temperature and relative humidity once the building has been occupied. Be sure to use a pin type moisture meter on dense reclaimed wood.
3. Enough ‘cleats’ for nail down jobs will help prevent the floor from moving too much. You should nail a 6” inch wide floor every 4”, an 8” inch wide floor every 3”, etc.

Call 800-336-3118 anytime we can help with your reclaimed wood questions.