Green Building with Eco-Friendly Architectural Salvage Yards

More and more, homeowners as well as commercial builders are realizing that there is a virtual treasure trove of building materials already at hand, and using some creativity along with a generous amount of flexibility, one can create masterpieces with reclaimed materials. Gone are the days when only bargain-hunters are on the lookout for recycled building materials. In fact, some of the most unique and interesting interiors employ antique and reclaimed materials. One of my favorite coffee shops in Paris features ornate doors and window frames salvaged from local renovation projects as the interior decor, and the shop draws visitors from all over the city.

Here in the USA, there are salvage depots and warehouses in every locale, but three of them have gained a national reputation for those on the lookout for quality reclaimed materials.

Heritage Salvage

Heritage Salvage in Petaluma, CA has more than three acres of reclaimed building materials including everything from reclaimed old growth redwood lumber to bar tops and barn doors. In addition to salvaging and restoring building materials, Heritage also crafts custom furniture and other pieces from reclaimed wood. Heritage’s commitment to reducing waste through reclamation is not its only green initiatives. Many of the stacks of wood are protected from the Northern California drizzle by former billboards that owner Michael “Bug” Deakin buys in bulk for rain protection that is both durable and recycled. In addition to its huge collection of reclaimed building materials, the Heritage Salvage Yard is home to organic gardens and beehives. Deakin plans a water catchment system in the future.

ReNew Salvage

ReNew Salvage, based in Brattleboro, Vt, is a non-profit architectural salvage yard committed to reducing construction waste and help low income families build affordable yet high quality housing. Proceeds from the salvage yard support ReNew Salvage’s other programs, which include deconstruction services, community workshops on topics related to green building, and job training for at-risk youth.

Second Use

Founded in 1994 by a contractor and environmentalist who became frustrated after seeing the large amounts of waste produced during construction and demolition of buildings, Seattle-based Second Use remains committed to reclaiming and reusing building materials to reduce waste and create unique and beautiful eco-friendly buildings. In addition to the large salvage yard, Second Use offers demolition services and hosts free workshops for contractors, home owners, and others interested in building with reclaimed materials.

Thanks to Green Marketing (Original link: http://www.greenmarketing.tv/2010/07/19/how-to-start-an-eco-friendly-architectural-salvage-yard/)