Happy National Forest Products Week!

Doe Near River-Recovered Logs

 

Happy National Forest Products Week! Since 1960 the third week of October has been designated as National Forest Products Week (NFPW). The modern celebration has stayed true to the initial proclamation and has added the environmental needs of keeping our forests healthy for future generations.

“Whereas the bounty of our forest and timber lands provides our people with a source of strength and pride; and
Whereas as a major renewable resource, supported by the science of modern forestry, wood offers the availability and abundance to satisfy the Nation’s ever growing needs for many products—lumber, paper, building materials, chemicals, furniture, and cloth—all dedicated to improving the lives of our people…” – Dwight D. Eisenhower, Proclamation 3371

The Longleaf Pine forest is the prime example of why both views of the NFPW are important. The remnant of this once vast forest shows the importance of sustainably harvesting our natural resources. Being over-harvested in the 19th and 20th century we are lucky that these logs have survived to be used today. Had they rotted this resource would be limited at best today. To the original proclamation Heart Pine is an outstanding resource we have available to use. We should take pride in our forests and their abilities to provide for us and work together to ensure their health and availably for years to come.

 

https://heartpine.com/goodwins-environmental-mission/

https://www.fs.usda.gov/science-technology/forest-products-week

https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/documents/proclamation-3371-national-forest-products-week-1960

John Muir’s Walk with Heartpine

By Jeffrey Forbes Marketing Coordinator and Resident Historian Every Goodwin floor is a conversation piece, and each detail prompts a story for its rich and historic past.  We know all about the durability and sustainability of a quality heartpine floor.  You can see it in the tightness of the River-Recovered® longleaf grain and you can […]

Green Building with Eco-Friendly Architectural Salvage Yards

More and more, homeowners as well as commercial builders are realizing that there is a virtual treasure trove of building materials already at hand, and using some creativity along with a generous amount of flexibility, one can create masterpieces with reclaimed materials. Gone are the days when only bargain-hunters are on the lookout for recycled building materials. In fact, some of the most unique and interesting interiors employ antique and reclaimed materials. One of my favorite coffee shops in Paris features ornate doors and window frames salvaged from local renovation projects as the interior decor, and the shop draws visitors from all over the city.

Here in the USA, there are salvage depots and warehouses in every locale, but three of them have gained a national reputation for those on the lookout for quality reclaimed materials.

Heritage Salvage

Heritage Salvage in Petaluma, CA has more than three acres of reclaimed building materials including everything from reclaimed old growth redwood lumber to bar tops and barn doors. In addition to salvaging and restoring building materials, Heritage also crafts custom furniture and other pieces from reclaimed wood. Heritage’s commitment to reducing waste through reclamation is not its only green initiatives. Many of the stacks of wood are protected from the Northern California drizzle by former billboards that owner Michael “Bug” Deakin buys in bulk for rain protection that is both durable and recycled. In addition to its huge collection of reclaimed building materials, the Heritage Salvage Yard is home to organic gardens and beehives. Deakin plans a water catchment system in the future.

ReNew Salvage

ReNew Salvage, based in Brattleboro, Vt, is a non-profit architectural salvage yard committed to reducing construction waste and help low income families build affordable yet high quality housing. Proceeds from the salvage yard support ReNew Salvage’s other programs, which include deconstruction services, community workshops on topics related to green building, and job training for at-risk youth.

Second Use

Founded in 1994 by a contractor and environmentalist who became frustrated after seeing the large amounts of waste produced during construction and demolition of buildings, Seattle-based Second Use remains committed to reclaiming and reusing building materials to reduce waste and create unique and beautiful eco-friendly buildings. In addition to the large salvage yard, Second Use offers demolition services and hosts free workshops for contractors, home owners, and others interested in building with reclaimed materials.

Thanks to Green Marketing (Original link: http://www.greenmarketing.tv/2010/07/19/how-to-start-an-eco-friendly-architectural-salvage-yard/)

Green Building

Many floor covering products contribute points toward a LEED green building certification. Here are a few of the points you can look up under the standard for more information: MR 4.1 – post-consumer plus ½ pre-consumer for 10% or 20% of cost of project materials receives 1 or 2 points MR 5.1 or 5.2 – […]

Green Building Fortifies Floor Covering Futures

Green building involves health, water conservation, energy efficiency, disaster mitigation and, of course, sustainable floor coverings. A certified green building is intended to keep you

Reclaimed Wood Flooring is Green

Reclaimed Wood Flooring is Green

healthier, save you money and help ensure the building’s durability. There are several national certifications and over half of states have regional, state or city certification programs.

Builders generally believe that green building certification is not worth the expense and time. Those who do get certifications most often opt for Energy Star or just a HERS rating. There is an expectation that many builders who currently get Energy Star certifications will drop out of the program when Version 3 goes into effect in January 2012 due to added challenges for thermal enclosure and preventing water intrusion.

Builders need to explore the costs and benefits of certification and incorporate certification into their business’s marketing plan. Average certification costs, including the third party certifier and the fees to the certifying organization, for a building of 1,750 square feet or less range from $600+/- for a local program to $2,500+/- for one of the national programs, according to Dr. Jennifer Languell, Trifecta Construction Solutions, Ft. Myers, Florida.

The Appraisal Institute offers a green certification for appraisers. Recently they announced an addendum to the Fannie Mae Form 1004 that lets appraisers add the contributory value of a home’s green features. Some builders have seen an increase in appraisal values from 8% to 20% for green features if they spend time with the appraiser and give them a copy of the homeowner’s manual, case studies from the Green MLS Tool Kit and carefully walk them through the home.

Green building products entail an even more complex list of third party certifiers and a good deal of “greenwashing” as well. To have some fun do a search on the term ‘sins of green washing.’ A few of the certification bodies to know about that relate to floor coverings include: CRI’s Green Label Testing Program certifies low-emitting carpets, GreenGuard certifies a wide variety of floor covering products and Scientific Certification Systems have developed a broad range of product certification programs since 1984…stay tuned, to be continued!