Antique Heart Pine and Adaptive Re-use

Antique Heart Pine and Adaptive Re-use

The 1830s era Pennsylvania barn remodel project continues to receive publicity, praise and accolades.  In addition to milling the heart pine stair treads, Goodwin provided 2200sf of River-Recovered® Heart Pine Character and Old Florida for this adaptive re-use project.

Take a look at this in-depth post detailing the remodel:

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Are you working on a remodel or adaptive re-use project?  If so, give us a call. Our antique wood experts will be happy to help you creatively incorporate River-Recovered and/or reclaimed heart pine and/or heart cypress into your design.

Collegiate Charm

River-Recovered® Heart Cypress is Focal Point of the New Sandra Stetson Aquatic Center

Goodwin is proud to be part of another exciting collegiate project. The esteemed Stetson University in Deland, Florida is in the process of constructing the Sandra Stetson Aquatic Center.  The building is being built on the shore of Lake Beresford and the architecture is simply amazing!

The Sandra Stetson Aquatic Center will house both the Stetson University rowing team – The Hatters – as well as the Institute for Water and Environmental Resilience.  Goodwin is providing River-Recovered SELECT Heart Cypress 5-1/4″ center match profile for the building’s ceiling.  The interior portion will be finished with DIAMOND 7 by Heritage Wood Finish Company.  All of the product will be installed on the cambered ceilings.

Raw Material and First Pass of the Finishing Phase

Installation is Moving Along!

The architect is Preston Phillips from Bridgehampton, New York. Charles Perry Partners, Inc. is the General Contractor on the project. Goodwin worked with the fine team at Charles Perry Partners, Inc. on the Dasburg House project for the University of Florida.

Please stay tuned as we keep you updated on this exciting project!!!!

The Many Faces of Sinker Cypress

Sinker cypress is a gorgeous, versatile antique wood that can be custom crafted into paneling, ceilings, walls, shelves, fireplace mantles, bar tops, tables, desk tops and just about anything else you can imagine. The density of the grain and the massive size of the slabs makes sinker cypress the perfect wood for any unique, eye-catching project.

Take a look at this beautiful sinker cypress table we handcrafted for a client. It’s about two inches thick and 18″ wide and features one live edge and one real ax cut end.

Notice how well the table complements the clients’ solid antique longleaf flooring, which was also crafted by Goodwin.

Additional project details:

  • The faux cut end was crafted by our own Joe Collins.
  • The cast iron legs are from an antique sewing table that once belonged to the client’s grandmother.
  • Rod Hunt of Cedar Key, Florida dressed the table out using a 400-grit sandpaper and Danish Penetrating oil.

Interested in adding warmth or depth to a residential or corporate space? Contact us today and we will further demonstrate how sinker cypress can be incorporated into your home or office.

Uh Oh…What to do When Life Gives You Lemons, or a Hollow Log!

As you know, our founder George Goodwin personally inspects every log that we retrieve or receive. One day, we found ourselves with another beautiful sinker cypress log. However, George suspected it might have an extreme hollow. After a few passes on the head saw, the extent of the hollow revealed itself, leaving us with a gorgeous – but useless – sinker cypress log for our purposes of milling walls, paneling, etc.

George absolutely hates to waste any log, especially one as beautiful as this. Fortunately for us, one of our local clients happened to come by the mill and fell in love with this beloved sinker cypress log. He was already familiar with Goodwin wood having purchased flooring, beams, a mantle, table and more over the years. He deeply appreciated its rich history and had a vison for this lost log…a planter bench:

Moral of the story…You most certainly can transform a hollow log into a valued treasure!

The River View at Occoquan Celebrates Grand Opening

River-Recovered® Heart Cypress Helps This Modern Event Space Give a Nod to the Area’s Rich Culture and History

Goodwin Company, pioneers of River-Recovered® heart pine and cypress, is excited to celebrate the grand opening of The River View at Occoquan Regional Park, which is part of the NOVA (Northern Virginia) park system.  This wedding and event facility located at 9751 Ox Road in Lorton, Virginia officially opens on Saturday, June 23rd at 2:30pm. The building features 4200 square feet of custom 1×6 exterior siding milled from Goodwin’s River-Recovered Heart Cypress Select grade.  Additionally, another 1000 linear feet of River-Recovered Heart Cypress Select grade lumber is used as cladding on the site’s stand-alone pavilion.

Nestled along the banks where Virginia’s Occoquan River gently flows into the Potomac River, this beautiful and modern event space gives a nod to the areas rich culture and history. Heart cypress was the perfect material for this project given its superior exterior use properties and the area’s documented history with the species. Captain John Smith of Jamestown Colony fame made a circumnavigation of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries in 1608. Smith recounts in his journals seeing bald cypress trees as much as 18 feet in circumference, and up to 80 feet tall without a branch. Some trees were so large that a canoe made from a single tree could hold 40 men.  The foyer of the River View will be referred to as the 1608 room and will detail Smith’s voyage with story boards and a large compass rose on the floor.

“Goodwin Company is often specified in projects like these because of our dedication to ensuring each and every log is carefully recovered, graded and milled to the highest standards,” explains Carol Goodwin, President of Goodwin Company.  “It was important that this modern space included an accurate representation of the grand bald cypress trees that Captain John Smith was enamored with and so fondly wrote about.”

Senior Associate, Lisa Andrews with GWWO Architects in Baltimore, Maryland specified River-Recovered Heart Cypress after visiting The Naples Botanical Garden and seeing the wood Goodwin milled for that project. A&D Construction installed the siding, and Forrester Construction was the general contractor.

For more information on the June 23rd grand opening, please contact Cori Talbot or Carson Eonta at 571-477-3874 or riverview@nvrpa.org.

Sneak Peek: The River View at Occoquan Regional Park

Nestled along the banks where Virginia’s Occoquan River gently flows into the Potomac River, you’ll find a beautiful and modern event space that gives a nod to the areas rich culture and history.  The River View is being constructed at Occoquan Regional Park, which is part of the NOVA (Northern Virginia) park system.  This wedding and event facility features 4200 square feet of custom 1×6 exterior siding milled from Goodwin’s River-Recovered® Heart Cypress Select grade.  Additionally, another 1000 linear feet of River-Recovered Heart Cypress Select grade lumber is used as cladding on the site’s stand-alone pavilion.

Heart cypress is the perfect material for this project given its superior exterior use properties and the area’s documented history with the species.  Captain John Smith of Jamestown Colony fame made a circumnavigation of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries in 1608. Smith recounts in his journals seeing bald cypress trees as much as 18ft in circumference, and up to 80 feet tall without a branch. Some trees were so large that a canoe made from a single tree could hold 40 men.  The foyer of the River View will be referred to as the 1608 room and will detail Smith’s voyage with story boards and a large compass rose on the floor.

Senior Associate, Lisa Andrews with GWWO Architects in Baltimore, Maryland specified River-Recovered Heart Cypress after visiting the Naples Botanical Garden and seeing the wood Goodwin milled for that project. The work of GWWO Architects is well-known in Florida.  In Gainesville, the firm designed the Cade Museum of Creativity and Invention.  At the River View, A&D Construction is installing the siding, and Forrester Construction is the general contractor.  Visit the Cade Museum

Special thanks to Hospitality & Event Sales Manager, Cori Talbot and Events Coordinator, Carson Eonta for sharing these photos of the project under construction. And, stay tuned….you’ll soon see more photos and information about River View’s completion and grand opening in a future article.

Mid Century Meets 19th Century

This 1830’s era stone barn located in the northeast United States was recently converted into a gorgeous contemporary living space.  The owners chose to incorporate 5300 square feet of Goodwin’s River-Recovered® Heartpine Character and Old Florida Heartpine for solid wood flooring.  We also crafted the treads for the custom staircase.  This is another adaptive reuse project that effectively demonstrates how well traditional can mix with contemporary in modern design.

The owner of the home generously sent us photos of the project along with a kind note:

“Thought you might enjoy seeing the end result of your amazing floors.   My family and I absolutely love them and know we made the right decision putting Goodwin flooring in our barn home.  Enjoy the photos!”

 

Million Dollar St. Augustine Estate

Goodwin’s Legacy Heart Pine Select Adds Beauty and Value to Million Dollar St. Augustine Estate

Special thank you to Andrew Birchall with Birchall & Co. Real Estate. Mr. Birchall sent us these amazing photos of a million-dollar property he is representing which features Goodwin’s Legacy Heart Pine throughout.  Check it out:

This gorgeous modern home is a perfect example of how antique heart pine can be used to warm up a contemporary space.  The estate, located at 827 Ocean Palm Way in St. Augustine, Florida, is currently on the market if you are interested.  Be sure to check out the online virtual tour.

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(photos by Greg Lepera)

Sprucing Up Your Wood Floors After the Holidays

You’ve entertained, cooked and hosted dinners and parties. Once you take time to breathe, let us show you how easy your wood floors are to clean. You will find that regular cleaning and maintenance with rejuvenators and buffing every few years does wonders for even the best maintained floors. And, there is no better time to do this than after the holidays. Keeping your durable antique wood floor looking optimal for welcomed visitors takes a few easy, but necessary steps.

  • First, vacuum all the loose dirt using a soft bristle head. Spot clean by hand with WOCA Natural Soap Spray, the recommended cleaner for all of Goodwin’s factory finishes, or other mild wood floor cleaners from reputable manufacturers to get up tough spots. Avoid using solutions that must be combined with water and avoid harsh cleaners on your floor.
  • Next, use a quality cotton yarn twist mop with a little ‘soft’ water to clean any remaining dirt off the surface. You need two buckets to properly clean the floor: one containing the Natural Soap solution or other mild cleaner and a second bucket with pure water to rinse the mop. Change the water in the second bucket as needed to avoid a grayish gleam caused by dirty water. Wring out the mop vigorously. Mop in the direction of the grain. If you see water on your floor, your mop is probably too wet.
  • Third, if you need further cleaning, use Natural Soap Spray or another quality hardwood floor cleaner. We spray ours onto a section of the floor at a time to avoid excess moisture from too much cleaner. On a flat mop head, use multiple terry cloth covers that can be reversed to collect more dirt and then later machine washed.
  • Last, you may want to consider a quality maintenance refresher on occasion between cleanings. The WOCA Refresher can be mopped like the Natural Soap whereas some other products require applying and then using an orbital buffer. Different products have different set times so follow the manufacturer’s directions closely.

Remember, your friends at Goodwin are always available to answer any questions. Just give us a call

Reclaimed Wood Stairs, Stair Parts, Treads and Moldings

The Sustainable Design Choice

Architects and designers often specify Goodwin’s River-Recovered® and reclaimed antique wood in their sustainable designs.  While reclaimed wood flooring, wood feature walls and wood ceilings and paneling are most popular, Goodwin’s antique wood is also often handcrafted into beautiful reclaimed wood stairs, stair parts, treads and moldings.  Take a look at just a few applications where River-Recovered and reclaimed heart pine has been used:

Private Residence

Legacy Select, building reclaimed heart pine treads

Seachasers Restaurant, Jacksonville, Florida

River-Recovered heart pine treads

Legacy Vertical, building reclaimed heart pine treads

University of Florida (UF) Dasburg House – Home of the President of UF

River-Recovered heart pine treads

Private Residence with Christmas garland décor

Grand Opening of the Matheson Library & Archives

Open to Public this Saturday, October 14th

The Matheson Library & Archives will hold its grand opening celebration and tour on Saturday, October 14th from 11am – 4pm. The event is free and open to the public.  Goodwin milled an Old Florida longleaf heart pine floor for this very exciting historic preservation project.

Grand opening events include:

  • Guided tours of the Matheson Library & Archives (Bobby Parker, librarian and archivist)
  • Tour of the 1867 Matheson House (Peggy Macdonald, museum director)
  • Tison Tool Barn tour
  • Opening of the exhibit, “Finding the Fountain of Youth: Discovering Florida’s Magical Waters”

Formally the Gainesville Gospel Tabernacle Church and Melting Pot building, the Matheson Library & Archives has been renovated for the public and researchers alike to enjoy. We encourage you to stop by the grand opening event.  While there, be sure to check out the gorgeous Old Florida heart pine flooring!

 

 

Goodwin Proudly Sponsors Another Sustainable Design Project

Goodwin is a proud sponsor / partner of Team Daytona Beach and their participation in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon. Team Daytona Beach, which includes faculty and students from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Daytona State College, is embarking on a Solar BEACH (Building Efficient, Affordable, and Comfortable Homes) House project.  The

BEACH House is designed for a small family to live sustainably without sacrificing comfort.  Goodwin contributed 1000sf of random length heart pine shorts and a 6′-8″ River-Recovered® heart cypress slab to be used as a countertop.

Goodwin was approached by members of the Embry-Riddle and Daytona State College Solar Decathlon team to become sponsor of this project, which strives to promote environmentally responsible and sustainable building practices. Team Daytona Beach will build The BEACH House as an entry into the larger nationwide competition that features university teams from all over the country designing and building sustainable design projects. The 2017 Solar Decathlon Village will be open to the public in Denver, Colorado on Thursday, October 5th – Monday, October 9th and Thursday, October 12th – Sunday, October 15th.

Go Team Daytona Beach!

Learn more about the Solar BEACH House project:

Snow Slater House 2015 009

Floor featuring random length heart pine shorts, similar to the ones used in The BEACH House.

66812 2.25x24-34x6-8 SOLD

Slab #66812, which will be converted into a gorgeous River-Recovered Heart Cypress countertop for the project.

Historic Home Renovation Featuring Reclaimed Wood

We’ve featured photos of the gorgeous home in the Old Northeast Neighborhood of St. Petersburg, Florida owned by our good friend Maureen Stafford.  A previous article featured her reclaimed wood kitchen floor.

Maureen is restoring another historic home in St. Petersburg. She used 400 square feet of Goodwin’s Legacy building reclaimed heart pine select and vertical heart pine in the closets (which she made) and to fill in where she took out the floor vents. The replacement wood was a critical improvement to the new floor reclamation square footage.

Enjoy this video of the home.  Great job, Maureen!

Makes you want to move to St. Pete, huh…

Video courtesy of Jeff Royer, Distinctive Focus Photography

Read more about Maureen’s reclaimed wood kitchen floors

Sydonie Mansion

Historic Restoration Featuring Antique River-Recovered® Heart Pine Floor Boards

A popular destination for discerning visitors, Mount Dora, Florida is one of the quaintest little gems in the south.  It is home to the historic Sydonie Mansion, built in 1904 for Pittsburgh steel magnate, James L. Laughlin. It is the only known example of the work of esteemed architect, Grosvenor Atterbury, in the entire state of Florida. Atterbury specified quarter sawn, vertical grain, 2-1/2″ “hard” pine flooring throughout the majority of the 22,000 square foot palatial estate home.

The Laughlin family eventually sold the estate to Hampden Dubose Academy.  Then, in 2014, current owners Clark & Amy Frogley set out to restore the mansion and open a museum/event venue.

The leaking roof over the porch caused the center boards leading to the front door to rot.

The Frogleys, wanting to honor Atterbury’s original specifications, turned to Goodwin for assistance.  We milled full length 16ft tongue and groove River-Recovered® heart pine floor boards to help restore the porch to its former safe and stately glory.  The Frogleys then sanded and finished the beautiful porch that had long ago been painted brown.

From This….

To This

…And a few extra for your viewing pleasure!

Reclaimed Wood Kitchen Floors Blend Perfectly with Contemporary Accents

We are proud to show off the beautiful kitchen in the home of our good friend and client, Maureen Stafford.  Maureen is a preservationist and past president of the Old Northeast Neighborhood Association in St. Petersburg, Florida.  Goodwin milled 1020 square feet of Legacy building reclaimed heart pine select and vertical flooring to help with her restoration project.

We absolutely adore her gorgeous reclaimed wood kitchen floors.  Just look at how the antique wood perfectly blends with the contemporary countertops, appliances and accents:

People often ask if antique wood is suitable for kitchens and the answer is, “YES!” In fact, most people who install reclaimed wood kitchen floors say they will never go back to having any other type of flooring in their kitchen, period. Goodwin’s new proprietary finishes formulated exclusively for resinous reclaimed and River-Recovered® antique wood are perfect for wood floors in your kitchen. The Diamond finish is second in hardness only to diamonds, making it suitable for high traffic areas, kids and pets. Oh, and all of our finishes are environmentally friendly, too.

Interested in learning more about how reclaimed wood kitchen floors can breathe new life into your home? Give us a call, we are here to help!

Contemporary Application of Building Reclaimed Longleaf Pine

Goodwin was proud to be part of the Nimbus building project in Gainesville, Florida.  We milled pine beams from an old depot building that was previously on the site to create gorgeous building reclaimed longleaf pine walls. Take a look:

River-Recovered® and reclaimed wood is perfect for energy efficient buildings such as Nimbus, as antique wood is an excellent insulator. And, let’s not forget to mention that it perfectly complements and warms up any modern space.  There are many contemporary uses for antique longleaf pine. Contact us to explore how this beautiful wood can make over your home or office.

Preserving the Past by Educating Our Future

Graduate Students Visit Goodwin for a Lesson in Reclaimed Wood

Goodwin Company is located just outside of Payne’s Prairie Preserve and within close proximity of the University of Florida (UF) campus.  This presents an opportunity for us to actively participate in education and environmental responsibility. Goodwin has partnered with UF to incorporate our antique wood into their contemporary, sustainable design projects, including:

  • The Dasburg House, home of Dr. Kent Fuchs, university president. This project featured Goodwin’s River-Recovered® Vertical Heart Pine, Legacy (building reclaimed) Vertical Heart Pine and Curly Heart Pine
  • The Otis Hawkins Center for UF athletes, which features 10,000 square feet of sustainable River-Recovered® Heart Pine ceiling and paneling.
  • The Periplanómenos Whistles featured on campus and handcrafted using Goodwin’s sinker cypress.

Last year, Goodwin had another opportunity to partner with UF.  We hosted graduate students from the school’s architecture program.  Jeffrey Forbes taught them about the history of Goodwin’s antique woods and our manufacturing process.  He also discussed the benefits of specifying Goodwin’s River-Recovered® and building reclaimed antique heart pine and heart cypress, especially in sustainable design. We believe we have an obligation to introduce students to reclaimed wood while emphasizing the importance of designing with sustainably sourced building materials. Through interactions with upcoming architects and designers, we hope to impact the future to reflect the craftsmanship and resiliency of our past.

Enjoy this short video highlighting their visit.

Naturally Modern

If you’re the mom who had the fewest hours of sleep this week, the employee working the longest shift, or are the business person with the craziest schedule, you’ve won the silent contest nagging all of us.  It seems that somewhere along the way, we’ve started glorifying busyness.  If we could take an honest look at our lives, I think we could agree this cycle is pointless. As a result of trying to cope with this constant state of exhaustion, we have turned towards modern design in our space. Its simplicity and functionality seems to appeal to the hectic lifestyles we have created for ourselves.

Simplicity.

When you hear the words modern design, images of steel pipes, concrete structures, open spaces, and smooth surfaces may come to mind.  Maybe you pictured a geometric chair in an otherwise relatively vacant space.

But modern design is much more than these extreme images—it strives to seamlessly transition the simplicity of nature into man-built space. Without explicitly natural elements, these spaces seem to fall short.  Wood tends to get forgotten in modern design, dismissed as traditional or stuffy.  But the simplicity of wood is innate and timeless.  It stands alone, bringing the simplicity of nature to any modern space.

Functionality.

What does it do?  Because wood is innately simple and beautiful, it has the ability to perform both functionally and artistically in a space.  Whether its edges are left rough as a tabletop or sanded smooth for flooring or paneling, wood is a diverse material that lends itself to a variety of applications.  Without the use of wood, modern design is vulnerable to creating useful spaces that are unlivable.  But wood brings a certain kind of softness, as Kinfolk’s Tina Minami Dhingra described, without forfeiting beauty, function, or simplicity.[1]

Goodwin’s wood bar top at Swamp Head brewery in Gainesville, Florida shows the practicality and beauty of heart wood in modern spaces.  The unique cuts of the wood bring an artistic yet functional appeal to the brewery, warming up the space making it a more conversational and livable environment.  This natural element is at home even among more traditional modern materials like the metal stools and concrete floors—proving the products versatility, integrating interior and exterior space while exemplifying responsible use of nature’s resources and bringing beauty to a space through a material once thought lost.[1]

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Lauren ColeyGuest Post by Lauren Corley

Lauren Corley is a guest author for Goodwin and is a senior in the Innovation Academy at the University of Florida studying Sustainability in the Built Environment with a minor in Innovation. She began her involvement with Goodwin at the 2015 Greenbuild conference in Washington D.C. She is from the Panhandle of Florida and gained an interest for sustainability and its use in space as a high school student. Since moving to Gainesville she has interned for the Repurpose Project as well as the Alachua County Public Schools under the Energy Conservation Specialist.

Sources: Sparke, Penny. “The Modern Interior Revisited.” Journal of Interior Design 34.1 (2008): V-Xii. Web.

[1] “THE KINFOLK HOME TOURS: THE SELF-MADE MODERNIST – Kinfolk.” Kinfolk. N.p., 2014. Web. 19 Aug. 2016.

 

Pop-A-Top

We were so excited to visit the new Pop-A-Top General Store at Depot Park. Goodwin’s Legacy heart pine floors and wall paneling make the old depot look as it did when it was first built in 1859[1]. Once a gathering place for travelers, the old train depot is now a community space again—but this time it is a congregation area for those who want to kick back and stay a while.  Park-goers can even stop in for a cool drink in a nostalgic atmosphere.

Goodwin is proud to have been a part of this renovation project. We provided our Legacy heart pine flooring back in 2012. Now, with the opening of the park, we have seen the space come alive. We love this type of project because it is both sustainable design and historic restoration through and through. At Goodwin, we get to see forgotten, antique wood brought to life each day. We understand the value of our history and its integral role in shaping our future.

 

Lauren ColeyGuest Post by Lauren Corley

Lauren Corley is a guest author for Goodwin and is a senior in the Innovation Academy at the University of Florida studying Sustainability in the Built Environment with a minor in Innovation. She began her involvement with Goodwin at the 2015 Greenbuild conference in Washington D.C. She is from the Panhandle of Florida and gained an interest for sustainability and its use in space as a high school student. Since moving to Gainesville she has interned for the Repurpose Project as well as the Alachua County Public Schools under the Energy Conservation Specialist.

[1] https://www.theclio.com/web/entry?id=21025

Old Florida Longleaf Heartpine – How the Old Becomes New

This year the old Melting Pot building in Gainesville, Florida will become home to the Matheson History Museum’s Library and Archives. Constructed in 1933, this building was originally the Gainesville Gospel Tabernacle and later became the Barrow Family Antique Store before it was most recently The Melting Pot Fondue restaurant. The building’s interior is being finished with the Goodwin Company’s Old Florida longleaf heart pine flooring reclaimed from old growth hurricane damaged forests. Harvesting these damaged trees does not contribute to deforestation and still produces a wood similar in hardness to Red Oak. Goodwin’s flooring, laced with red toned growth rings, complement the building’s original ceiling beams, contributing to the authenticity and aesthetic of this historic Gainesville building. The Matheson received private donations and a $300,000 grant from the Florida Department of State’s Division of Historical Resources to help finance this adaptive reuse project, which was completed by Joyner Construction, Jay Reeves Associates, and Rudy Ditmar of Rudy’s Professional floor sanding. We can’t wait to see this restoration finished and for the building to once again become a gathering place in our community!

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Lauren ColeyGuest Post by Lauren Corley

Lauren Corley is a guest author for Goodwin and is a senior in the Innovation Academy at the University of Florida studying Sustainability in the Built Environment with a minor in Innovation. She began her involvement with Goodwin at the 2015 Greenbuild conference in Washington D.C. She is from the Panhandle of Florida and gained an interest for sustainability and its use in space as a high school student. Since moving to Gainesville she has interned for the Repurpose Project as well as the Alachua County Public Schools under the Energy Conservation Specialist.