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Heart Cypress, Heart Pine and Wild Black Cherry

As Versatile as They Are Beautiful

Do you remember the beautiful and unique River-Recovered® Heart Pine Curly poker chip holders we featured awhile back?  The same millwork expert who created the poker chip holders is at it again.  Take a look at this gorgeous toolbox handcrafted by Jerry Yermovsky of Architectural Millwork Consulting (AMC).  He selected a combination of Goodwin’s vertical heart cypress, curly heart pine and wild black cherry for this project.  We are fortunate to have the opportunity to work with such an amazing architectural millwork craftsman.  Thanks for sharing these photos, Jerry!

Sustainable Wood Flooring – Popular in Coastal Areas

Sustainable wood flooring has always been popular in coastal areas. Goodwin recently provided 1200 square feet of 5-1/4” tongue and groove wild black cherry wood floors for the renovation of a vintage vernacular cottage (circa 1925) in Cedar Keys, Florida. The Cedar Keys are a cluster of islands in the Gulf of Mexico located just off of the northern Florida peninsula.

You can almost feel the cool breeze and hear the sound of gently rolling waves as you view these gorgeous photos.  The wild black cherry wood floors were handcrafted using sustainably harvested wood that was pre-finished with Diamond 7 (a proprietary finish developed exclusively for Goodwin by Heritage Wood Finish Company.)

Our friends at the Sustainable Design Group specified Goodwin’s sustainable wood flooring for this renovation project.  The wood flooring was installed by Matt Marwick of Precision Floorcrafters and the general contractor was Kenneth Edmunds of Delta Construction in Cedar Keys.

Love these photos and want to learn more?  Give us a call!  We will be happy to talk with you about how we can help you incorporate sustainable wood flooring into your coastal design or renovation project.

Photos courtesy of Mark J. Koper.

Wild Black Cherry Wood Feature Walls and Accents

Most people have seen wild black cherry hardwood flooring at one time or another, but did you know that the species is perfect for wood feature walls and accents, too?  Take a look at this beautiful office showroom for Avalon Park West community in Wesley Chapel, Florida.  Our good friend Chris Webb at CWebb Designs in Tampa crafted the interior using Goodwin’s wild black cherry. JNT Interiors was the designer on the project.

Photos by Bos Images

Wild black cherry wood floors have a history of being especially popular because of the arching grain patterns and slight mineral coloring.  These same unique features are also what makes is so desirable for wood feature walls, wood ceilings and accents.   Goodwin sustainably harvests this species and mills it into our exclusive wild black cherry engineered flooring, solid flooring, wood feature walls and wood ceilings.  Contact us today to find out how wild black cherry can add depth and warmth to your home or office!

Sustainably Harvested Wild Black Cherry Wood Flooring

Goodwin rescues trees which have fallen during storms and/or are scheduled to be cut down due to development. We work closely with foresters and land planners to sustainably harvest this beautiful wood to ensure it is not doomed to waste. One of the species we rescue is wild black cherry.

Wild black cherry primarily grows in the eastern half of North America and Mexico. Goodwin mills sustainably harvested wild black cherry logs into our solid wood flooring and engineered wood flooring. Some argue wild black cherry is more desirable than standard cherry because it often develops arching and/or burled grain patterns, along with slight mineral colors for added beauty. Wild black cherry’s natural coloration varies from deep pink to rich red brown tones.

This short but informative video shows Dan Petersen of Heritage Wood Finish Company pre-finishing a solid wild black cherry wood floor with a low sheen diamond 7 finish for one of our valued clients:

Our friends at The Sustainable Design Group in Gainesville, Florida are the architects for the remodeling of a home in Cedar Keys where the wild black cherry solid wood flooring you see in the video will be installed.

Interested in a wild black cherry solid wood floor or engineered wood floor?  If so, please give us a shout so we can custom craft a sustainably harvested wood floor just for you.

The Best Wood Flooring for Pets in Your Home

Luxury Solid Wood FlooringDoes the resilience of Heart Pine stand up to the normal wear and tear of pets? Yes it does! Let’s look at the Janka hardness scale (see our earlier post) for assurance. The Janka scale for Hard Maple (commonly used for basketball courts) is 1450. When people speak of pine flooring not being suitable for pets, they are referring to White Pine, which has a Janka scale rating of 380.

Heart Pine registers 1220 on the Janka hardness scale, which is equivalent to Red Oak and almost commensurate to basketball court strength. Contrary to popular belief, true Heart Pine flooring is actually harder than Cherry, Teak and Walnut. The key here is “true” – you definitely want to make sure the Heart Pine your are considering is “all heart”.

Many floor re-finishers also believe the type of finish is important. Try to avoid hard shell coatings with pets in the home. This type of finish is more likely to show marks.

True Antique Heart Pine allows you to enjoy the remarkable beauty of luxury wood flooring without isolating the furry members of your family!

More Reclaimed Wood Furniture Ideas

For the Artist in All of Us What is so wonderful about reclaimed wood furniture is the uniqueness of each piece. These stools made from reclaimed wood  are a great find, handcrafted by designer Nicolai Czumaj-Bront, no two are alike. He calls them “pitch stools”.

More Reclaimed Wood Furniture

Mitz Takahashi is a furniture designer/maker located in Montreal who works with reclaimed wood and materials. His creations range from vintage to modern, and his use of reclaimed wood gives his work that extra flair that makes people take notice. The hallway console, featured here is made from reclaimed Cherry, Walnut, Birch, Mahogany, Maple.   […]

Natural Color Changes

The rich color of old heart pine is one of the main benefits of an antique wood floor. A discussion of heart pine may help you to get the look you want. Several species of wood change color significantly as they age. Lumber from freshly sawn antique heart pine logs change from light yellows to deep orange-red browns as time passes. The color change is especially noticeable in longleaf heart pine of high resin content. Other species such as American black cherry, Jatoba (sold as Brazilian cherry) and purple heart also show a significant color transformation. Oxidation of components of the wood drives the change in color and it is accelerated by ultraviolet light. Covering part of a board with aluminum foil and leaving it in strong sun light for a day or two can cause enough darkening to be seen. For a new wood floor much of the change in color takes place in the first few weeks. However the richer tones continue to emerge for several months. Area rugs placed on the floor before this time will keep the areas under the rugs from darkening. Heart wood typically changes color significantly more than sap wood. The color of freshly sawn longleaf pine River recovered® logs is lighter while heart pine reclaimed from buildings is usually darker. Reclaimed heart pine can also contain some yellow portions that are associated with high resin concentrations. The color deepens to the same range in wood from either source. The degree of color change in a new floor is strongly affected by finish that is applied. The type of finish should be considered as a part of the decision to determine the final color of the floor.

Knowing what to expect can help you flooring installation go more smoothly.