Exploring the Rustic Side of Heart Pine

Goodwin’s Legacy Heart Pine in particular is a popular species often specified for projects in coastal areas. This new “lodge-like” home on Florida’s East Coast was designed by Marcia Hendry of Urban Cracker Design. Goodwin provided 1800 square feet of 7″ Vintage Precision Engineered (PE) and Legacy Naily Heart Pine for the project. The Vintage PE was used for flooring, and the Naily Heart Pine for paneling and cabinetry. Take a look:

The rich color and character of Legacy Heart Pine complements the metal and brick to create a distinguished yet rugged appearance. White ceramic was used to lighten the space. The walnut countertops and monkey pod wood slab table were crafted by Dan Peterson of Heritage Wood Finishing Company.

Hendry stumbled upon Goodwin while she was searching for unusual wood species.

“[Everyone at Goodwin was] wonderful to work with and always supplied samples and superb knowledge. They’re awesome, and that’s an understatement! Local, been around for a long time, and know what they’re doing: that’s what I think separates Goodwin from the rest.”

Marcia Hendry, Urban Cracker Design

Photos courtesy of Kamaran Wilson

Linking the Past with the Future – Sarasota Art Museum Opens with Incredible Story of Adaptive Re-Use and Building Material Recycling

Goodwin Company Tapped to Transform Historic Wood Assets into
Modern Engineered Heart Pine Flooring

The new Sarasota Art Museum is a remarkable story of adaptive re-use and building material recycling.  Housed in the old 1926 Sarasota High School building, it is a contemporary art museum in the Kunsthalle tradition and now a premier venue for revolving shows of contemporary art.

Goodwin Company, pioneers of River-Recovered® heart pine and heart cypress, was recruited to participate in this adaptive re-use project by general contractor, Willis-Smith.  The focus was to transform the second and third floors of the high school building by remodeling the boxy classroom space into two open concept exhibition halls.

All of the heart pine joists from each floor were removed and replaced with steel joists.  The design team envisioned recycling the beams and turning them into finished wood flooring.  Willis-Smith contacted Goodwin and the rest is history.

Goodwin Company cleaned the beams of all foreign objects, re-sawed the material into 1×6 lamellas and then milled it into 23,000 square feet of Precision Engineered heart pine flooring.  What resulted was a magnificent story of adaptive re-use and building material recycling.

 “Goodwin Company is often specified for adaptive re-use projects because of our dedication to ensuring each and every piece of antique wood is carefully cleaned, sawn, and milled to the highest standards,” explains Carol Goodwin, President of Goodwin Company.  “It was important to ensure this new modern space gave a nod to the heart pine that was so much a part of the building’s rich history.”

The old Sarasota High School is a three-story building designed by architect Leo Elliott in the neo-gothic tradition. Behind the Sarasota Art Museum sits the modern Sarasota High School designed in 1959 by architect Paul Rudolph. Architecturally, the two buildings stand in stark contrast to one another.  Several years ago, the circa 1926 building came up for sale and was under the threat of demolition. Concerned parties influenced the Sarasota School Board to lease the building to the Ringling College of Art & Design to create the new Sarasota Art Museum.

Lawson Group Architects led the adaptive reuse of the buildings, and Terence Riley of Keenan/Riley is the design architect for the project.  Sarasota Art Museum’s executive director, Anne-Marie Russell, played a significant design role as well.

Look for more photos of the complete project coming soon!

Hicks Koski Tower
Tom & Sherri Koski Gallery
Photography: Ryan Gamma
Artist: Sheila Hicks Questioning Column

Sarasota Art Museum Hicks Koski Tower

Goodwin Precision Engineered Heart Pine

Renovation In-Process

Precision Engineered Midnight Heart Cypress – Beautiful and Unique

Midnight Heart Cypress is an interesting antique wood with a distinct look and style.  Take a look at these photos of a gorgeous Precision Engineered Midnight Heart Cypress floor in a home in Texas:

Photos Courtesy of Oldham Goodwin Group, LLC

The home was expertly constructed by Martin & Sims Development.  Goodwin partnered with them to provide 1690 square feet of 7″ Precision Engineered River-Recovered® Midnight Heart Cypress with an oil finish for flooring and stair treads.

Midnight Heart Cypress is as unique as it is beautiful.  Here are some of its architectural features and specifications:

  • Available with arching grain patterns
  • Shows light to dark chocolate tones
  • No knots over 1-1/4”
  • 100% heart
  • 100% dense growth with up to eight growth rings per inch
  • 690 on the Janka scale comparable to Douglas Fir (660)

Midnight Heart Cypress – which displays a range of cozy brown hues, varying from light to dark chocolates – is milled from the same antique logs as lighter Heart Cypress. Its rich textured look makes it perfect for floors, walls, stairs and ceilings.

Want to learn more about how to incorporate either solid or Precision Engineered Midnight Heart Cypress into your home or office? Give us a call today!

View our Midnight Cypress Collection

A Closer Look at Precision Engineered Wood Flooring

Precision Engineered wood flooring is crafted from the same wood used in our solid wood flooring options. Take a look at this familiar residential project that incorporates Goodwin’s Vintage Heart Pine Precision Engineered wood flooring throughout the home:

The original flooring was white tile.  The homeowners wanted to update their home with a timeless look.  Since the classic look of antique wood never goes out of style, Goodwin crafted the Vintage Heart Pine Precision Engineered wood flooring you see throughout this home from reclaimed heartpine beams.

Precision Engineered wood flooring is an attractive option because it is often more affordable than solid wood flooring and can be easily glued directly on to a concrete slab.  While most engineered products cannot be sanded and refinished, Goodwin’s Precision Engineered wood flooring features a thick 4mm wear layer, allowing it to be refinished multiple times.

Would you like to learn more about how Goodwin’s Precision Engineered wood flooring can transform your home or office? If so, give our antique wood specialists a call today.

I’m Building a New Custom Home. When Should I Select My Flooring?

When should you select flooring for your new custom home?  Ideally, this process will begin while your architect is designing your home.  Too often, people wait until their home is under construction to begin seriously considering flooring options.  This can lead to significant pitfalls. Below is a summary of the main reasons why wood flooring should be specified during the design process.

Flooring Affects Numerous Aspects of the Home

Certain aspects of a home are affected by the type and height of the proposed flooring.  For instance, the baseboards for solid wood flooring need to be set differently than baseboards for an engineered product.  Subfloor is also a consideration.  Whether your home will be slab-on-grade and/or over a joist system defines whether you should use solid plank or engineered flooring.  Knowing the exact flooring you plan to incorporate into your new home will help ensure various aspects of the construction process are smooth and seamless.

Lead Time for Production

Depending on the type of wood flooring you are considering the production lead time could be a major factor.  It takes much more time to manufacture wood flooring from newly recovered logs than it does to custom craft a floor from on-hand inventory.

Acclimation

Wood flooring should not be installed immediately upon delivery as it needs to be properly acclimated before installation. Certain factors such as humidity, subflooring and change of season can affect acclimation time.  You want to make sure your flooring is delivered to your home site in time for it to be properly acclimated to the room(s) where it will be installed.

If you are working with a building design professional to develop plans for a new custom home, be sure to connect with us during this process.  Our wood flooring specialists will work alongside you and your design team to help select the best wood flooring to meet your needs.  We’re here to help!

Precision Engineered Heart Pine and Concrete Slabs

We are often asked if our antique flooring can be installed over concrete.  The answer is, “YES!”

This modern farmhouse was designed using reclaimed post and beam construction, a style typical of old New England farmhouses.  Interestingly, while the design is typical, the foundation is slab on grade which is not typical of New England. Therefore, the architect specified Goodwin’s engineered flooring to glue down, sand and finish on site. The final product was 1925sf of 7″ Vintage Precision Engineered (PE) flooring along with 32 Legacy™ (building reclaimed) heart pine stair treads.

Precision Engineered Heart Pine and Concrete Slabs

Photos by Lee Mallett.  Click the photo to see the project gallery.

Lee Mallett of Giltedge Builders in Etna, New Hampshire is the builder and Christopher Smith in Norwich, Vermont is the architect.

Goodwin’s Precision Engineered Heart Pine Wood Flooring

Take a look at this gorgeous Precision Engineered Heart Pine wood flooring that just came off of our finish line.  It is coated with Diamond 7, a proprietary finish developed by Heritage Wood Finish Company specifically for Goodwin’s River-Recovered® wood.

Goodwin’s Precision Engineered Heart Pine wood flooring is handcrafted using the same high quality heart pine as our solid wood lines.  And, unlike inferior engineered flooring products, ours has thick wear layers so it can be sanded over and over again.  These wear layers also help the floor remain flat in changing humidity.

Let’s take a look at some other interesting facts that solidify Goodwin’s position as the industry gold standard in engineered wood flooring:

  • Goodwin was the first reclaimed wood company in America to produce an engineered floor in the U.S.A
  • We use sustainable River-Recovered and reclaimed wood to produce our precision engineered wood flooring products
  • Safe for kids and pets – Goodwin uses low formaldehyde glues and a certified “green” back
  • Manufactured in long lengths to look like solid wood
  • Lifetime structural warranty on the floor
  • 20 year warranty on the finish

Looking to remodel your home or office in the upcoming year?  Goodwin’s Precision Engineered wood flooring experts are ready to help.  Give us a call today!

 

Walk on Diamonds!

How is this for color – check out our Wild Black Cherry hardwood, brushed and pigmented with grey and topped with a Diamond coating (second in hardness only to diamonds!)

We recently created this for a customer who wanted the grain and features of cherry, with exceptional durability and grey coloring. So, we created a special-formulated, custom coating to match the color they desired with a more resistant wear layer suited for a commercial floor. The small inset is the natural color of cherry so you can see the difference.

CherryPigmentedGrey

Whatever your style, we can create it.
Call us today – we like to help!

Quick Tips to Consider When Developing Building Design Specifications

Condos and Vacation Homes

Condominiums and vacation homes are often not occupied for several months during the year. If the HVAC is left off during the summer, humidity can build up and get in between the boards to the underside and cause the floor to cup. Of course, to solve the problem, you must understand the problem. This issue can be prevented by back sealing the boards with inexpensive polyurethane before installation. If you expect the interior conditions to not be controlled year round, this balances both sides of the wood to avoid cupping.

Wide Board and Large Rooms

When working with wide boards or large rooms, consider starting the installation in the middle of the room. Nail toward both walls with spline glued into the grooves of the middle boards. The tongue side should be held down with sufficient fasteners, so most of the movement occurs on the groove side. This technique essentially cuts your shrink/swell in half.

Installation Over Concrete

When installing either solid or glued engineered wood over concrete on grade, we always recommend sealing the concrete. A well-made engineered wood with a water resistant plywood backer and high-quality glue can even survive a leak.  It will generally dry out and will usually be fine if you get the water off relatively quickly, but it will not be able to dry if the concrete is not sealed.

Acclimation and Moisture

Every wood floor professional should own a moisture meter. Use the kind with pins that measure electrical resistance and orient the pins with the grain, as that is how the meters are calibrated. Meters that sit on top of wood measure specific gravity and do not work well on dense reclaimed wood. This step is the most important specification to make sure that the wood and site are acclimated and installed at the expected long-term moisture content and living conditions.

Nails and Fasteners

Be sure to use enough fasteners for a nail down floor. Our recommended nail schedule is as follows:

Solid Wood:

  • Every 6” for a 3” face
  • Every 4” for a 5” face
  • Every 3” for a 7” face
  • Every 2” for a 9” face

And, no more than 1-1/2” from end to avoid splits.

Engineered Wood:

  • Every 6″ for a 3 face”
  • Every 5” for a 5 face”
  • Every 4” for a 7” face

Wider products require more nails to get close to the same average number of nails per square foot. You must consider more than just the expansion and contraction of the flooring. It is also very important to get the flooring to conform to the sub floor. At the end of the day, it all comes down to the quality of installation you want. The good installers we know use more nails than average.

Made in America…

More and more, today’s consumers are looking for local and sustainable options.  Whether it’s locally grown produce from the neighborhood farmer’s market or recycled building products from the local architectural salvage company, today’s marketplace demands an alternative to inferior and poorly crafted imports.  It should come as no surprise that discerning homeowners all over the country are seeking out similar products in the way of authentic, “Made in the U.S.A.” wood flooring.

We thought you’d like to see the fascinating process that Goodwin Company goes through to bring clients the finest in reclaimed heart pine engineered flooring.  In 2007, Goodwin became the first reclaimed wood company in the United States to manufacture an engineered floor here at home and not overseas.  Goodwin offers its Precision Engineered product in both River-Recovered® and Legacy (building reclaimed) Heart Pine.

The following photos are very interesting and intriguing.  They take you through the multi-stepped process of milling the highest quality flooring we know (even if it’s used as wainscoting like our clients did at the new Sea Scout base in Galveston, Tx.)  From the reclamation of gigantic heart pine beams out of deconstructed 19th century industrial buildings to sawing and finishing the final product, Goodwin means quality.  Goodwin means, “Made in America”.

Goodwin Company Featured on ABC “Made in America” Series

Special thank you to Emily Burris and the ABC TV 20 (WCJB) team for featuring Goodwin Company for their “Made in America” series. Check it out:

Aren’t Wood Floors Difficult to Clean?

One of the many myths about wood floors is that they are difficult to clean and maintain. That may have been true long ago, but now, with the high quality finishes available, wood floor upkeep is quite simple. In fact, it is no more laborious than cleaning any other type of flooring surface. Many people […]

Reclaimed Wood Flooring… 5 Things to Learn in 5 Minutes

The following tips have links if you want more detail. Or call and talk with our in-house technical expert, Andrew St. James.

1. Help in choosing a reclaimed wood floor…

Begin with a few choices:
· Do you want a unique floor witha story?
· Light, medium or dark? Consistent or color variation?
· Pin stripes, bold arches or subtle graining?
· Single or random widths?
· ‘Character’, pristine or in between?
· How about knots or do you want ‘clear’?
Maybe you just want to see a few of these characteristics in River Recovered Heart PineLegacy Heart PineRiver Recovered Heart Cypress… or Sustainably Harvested Woods.

Antique Heart Pine is the most frequently specified reclaimed wood.’Virgin growth’ heart pine, the ‘wood that built America’. is all heartwood, very hard and comes in many grades.

Some of the more commonlyavailable reclaimed woodsinclude: American Chestnut, Heart Cypress, Douglas Fir, Eastern White Pine and Oak.

2. Which finish should you use on reclaimed wood?

The finish you choose can dramatically change the look of your floor. While most reclaimed wood is sanded and finished smooth to the touch, you can have a distressed floor. Distressing simulates old, old floors or barn siding and is usually done on milling machines, though it can also be done onsite by craftsmen.

How you want to maintain your wood floordetermines if you want polyurethane that requires a professional to repair or if you want an oil finish that you can refresh when scratches occur. The oil finishes are very natural and low sheen; however, they can be made to have degrees of shine. They are especially appropriate for heavy traffic and come with easy maintenance products.

3. Would solid or engineered reclaimed wood work best for you?

Engineered wood is a growing market. Goodwin began engineered flooring to help conserve the rare River Recovered® wood. While solid wood floor may remain the ‘gold standard’ for those who can accommodate its greater demands, now you can have ‘USA made’ engineered flooringthat looks and lasts like solid and is easierto fit into the construction cycle.

4. Not all reclaimed wood is equal…

To consistently manufacture a well made reclaimed woodfloor that is properly kiln-dried, precisely milled, graded to established standards and backed by in-house technical expertise requires a considerable investment. Reclaimed wood can be a confusing niche. You may want to know some terminology when specifying antique heart pine. Building design professionals may want our free continuing education course on Architectural and Design Uses of Reclaimed Wood.

5. Installation tips to help your reclaimed wood perform well for a lifetime and beyond.

Once you have chosen your floor, what about installation? How to select a wood floor professional, even tips on existing subfloors are on our blogs. It is possible to get any stair parts or millwork in the same grade as your floor.

Engineered floor installation, when glued to concrete, needs to have an elastomeric type adhesive made for engineered wood. We generally suggest a vapor retarder over the slab. Even if the slab is dry now a seal coat ensures against future leaks or storms.

Just a few of the important tips to help ensure your solid wood floor installation:
1. The sub floor needs to be flat and level to within 3/16” over 10 feet for nail down or flat within 1/8” over 6 feet for glue down installation.
2. The moisture content of the wood floor and the sub-floor need to match the expected indoor temperature and relative humidity once the building has been occupied. Be sure to use a pin type moisture meter on dense reclaimed wood.
3. Enough ‘cleats’ for nail down jobs will help prevent the floor from moving too much. You should nail a 6” inch wide floor every 4”, an 8” inch wide floor every 3”, etc.

Call 800-336-3118 anytime we can help with your reclaimed wood questions.