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Goodwin Company Featured at IBS 2017

Goodwin Company Featured Alongside the Hottest Contemporary Home Ideas at IBS 2017

Goodwin Company was proud to show off our wood at the 2017 International Builders’ Show (IBS).  This year, the show featured the latest in contemporary home ideas.  We were excited to see just how many ways our River-Recovered® Heart Pine and River-Recovered Heart Cypress can be used to complement the numerous products showcased.

Special thank you to Hafele America. Their booth featured a beautiful Heart Cypress slab countertop. Michael Bright of Bright Woodworks in St. Petersburg, Florida crafted it using Goodwin wood. It was one of the biggest hits of the show!

Jeffrey Forbes, Goodwin’s marketing coordinator, produced this wonderful video summarizing the 2017 IBS:

IBS 2017 reinforced that sustainable design is becoming more and more important to consumers. Goodwin has and always will operate using sustainable, eco-friendly manufacturing practices. Esteemed architects and designers specify Goodwin’s materials for all types of work, including modern and sustainable design projects.

2017 is the year to add wood to your contemporary space.  Wood walls are especially chic and add depth, warmth and character. Not only is it easy to install, but its insulation benefits are impressive (one inch of wood is equivalent to 15” of concrete).  Incorporating wood on the outside of your home or corporate space is also “in” for 2017.  Antique Heart Cypress, including the on-hand, faster ship stock Goodwin currently on has special, is perfect for exterior ceiling and paneling because it is not only absolutely gorgeous, but also rot resistant.

Enjoy Jeffrey’s video from IBS, and give us a call to see how we can help you make over your space in 2017.

Naturally Modern

If you’re the mom who had the fewest hours of sleep this week, the employee working the longest shift, or are the business person with the craziest schedule, you’ve won the silent contest nagging all of us.  It seems that somewhere along the way, we’ve started glorifying busyness.  If we could take an honest look at our lives, I think we could agree this cycle is pointless. As a result of trying to cope with this constant state of exhaustion, we have turned towards modern design in our space. Its simplicity and functionality seems to appeal to the hectic lifestyles we have created for ourselves.

Simplicity.

When you hear the words modern design, images of steel pipes, concrete structures, open spaces, and smooth surfaces may come to mind.  Maybe you pictured a geometric chair in an otherwise relatively vacant space.

But modern design is much more than these extreme images—it strives to seamlessly transition the simplicity of nature into man-built space. Without explicitly natural elements, these spaces seem to fall short.  Wood tends to get forgotten in modern design, dismissed as traditional or stuffy.  But the simplicity of wood is innate and timeless.  It stands alone, bringing the simplicity of nature to any modern space.

Functionality.

What does it do?  Because wood is innately simple and beautiful, it has the ability to perform both functionally and artistically in a space.  Whether its edges are left rough as a tabletop or sanded smooth for flooring or paneling, wood is a diverse material that lends itself to a variety of applications.  Without the use of wood, modern design is vulnerable to creating useful spaces that are unlivable.  But wood brings a certain kind of softness, as Kinfolk’s Tina Minami Dhingra described, without forfeiting beauty, function, or simplicity.[1]

Goodwin’s wood bar top at Swamp Head brewery in Gainesville, Florida shows the practicality and beauty of heart wood in modern spaces.  The unique cuts of the wood bring an artistic yet functional appeal to the brewery, warming up the space making it a more conversational and livable environment.  This natural element is at home even among more traditional modern materials like the metal stools and concrete floors—proving the products versatility, integrating interior and exterior space while exemplifying responsible use of nature’s resources and bringing beauty to a space through a material once thought lost.[1]

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Lauren ColeyGuest Post by Lauren Corley

Lauren Corley is a guest author for Goodwin and is a senior in the Innovation Academy at the University of Florida studying Sustainability in the Built Environment with a minor in Innovation. She began her involvement with Goodwin at the 2015 Greenbuild conference in Washington D.C. She is from the Panhandle of Florida and gained an interest for sustainability and its use in space as a high school student. Since moving to Gainesville she has interned for the Repurpose Project as well as the Alachua County Public Schools under the Energy Conservation Specialist.

Sources: Sparke, Penny. “The Modern Interior Revisited.” Journal of Interior Design 34.1 (2008): V-Xii. Web.

[1] “THE KINFOLK HOME TOURS: THE SELF-MADE MODERNIST – Kinfolk.” Kinfolk. N.p., 2014. Web. 19 Aug. 2016.

 

Quick Tips to Consider When Developing Building Design Specifications

Condos and Vacation Homes

Condominiums and vacation homes are often not occupied for several months during the year. If the HVAC is left off during the summer, humidity can build up and get in between the boards to the underside and cause the floor to cup. Of course, to solve the problem, you must understand the problem. This issue can be prevented by back sealing the boards with inexpensive polyurethane before installation. If you expect the interior conditions to not be controlled year round, this balances both sides of the wood to avoid cupping.

Wide Board and Large Rooms

When working with wide boards or large rooms, consider starting the installation in the middle of the room. Nail toward both walls with spline glued into the grooves of the middle boards. The tongue side should be held down with sufficient fasteners, so most of the movement occurs on the groove side. This technique essentially cuts your shrink/swell in half.

Installation Over Concrete

When installing either solid or glued engineered wood over concrete on grade, we always recommend sealing the concrete. A well-made engineered wood with a water resistant plywood backer and high-quality glue can even survive a leak.  It will generally dry out and will usually be fine if you get the water off relatively quickly, but it will not be able to dry if the concrete is not sealed.

Acclimation and Moisture

Every wood floor professional should own a moisture meter. Use the kind with pins that measure electrical resistance and orient the pins with the grain, as that is how the meters are calibrated. Meters that sit on top of wood measure specific gravity and do not work well on dense reclaimed wood. This step is the most important specification to make sure that the wood and site are acclimated and installed at the expected long-term moisture content and living conditions.

Nails and Fasteners

Be sure to use enough fasteners for a nail down floor. Our recommended nail schedule is as follows:

Solid Wood:

  • Every 6” for a 3” face
  • Every 4” for a 5” face
  • Every 3” for a 7” face
  • Every 2” for a 9” face

And, no more than 1-1/2” from end to avoid splits.

Engineered Wood:

  • Every 6″ for a 3 face”
  • Every 5” for a 5 face”
  • Every 4” for a 7” face

Wider products require more nails to get close to the same average number of nails per square foot. You must consider more than just the expansion and contraction of the flooring. It is also very important to get the flooring to conform to the sub floor. At the end of the day, it all comes down to the quality of installation you want. The good installers we know use more nails than average.

An Easy and Affordable Upgrade to Any Home or Office Space

Did you know wood walls are easy to incorporate into any existing space? And, there are tons of benefits which add both beauty and value to your home or office. Reclaimed wood walls:

  1. Require no waiting on a major renovation
  2. Are an interesting “conversation piece” because of its beauty and history
  3. Adds incredible and efficient insulation – it takes fifteen inches of concrete to equal the insulation qualities of just one inch of wood

This article from Houzz is a great resource:

http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/32586777/list/what-to-know-about-adding-a-reclaimed-wood-wall

In the article, the designer for the bathroom – Claudie Durbell – says it should cost $4 to $7; however, that is for barn wood. Goodwin is offering factory finished tongue and groove 1,000 year-old antique heart cypress that is warm and mysterious for only pennies more. In fact, for an 8X8 space, our highest end Heart Cypress Vertical grain sale grade costs under $600 in material!

Call us today for a complimentary consultation to explore how you can best incorporate this magnificent antique wood – on sale this month – in your home or office.

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Photo Journal from the National Wood Flooring Association Expo (NWFA) St. Louis, MO

Dan Peterson and I traveled to St. Louis for the NWFA Expo. We had a wonderful time, seeing a lot of old friends and meeting new ones.   Here is a photo journal with some highlights from our trip:

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Can I Install Wood Flooring Over Concrete?

Can I install wood flooring over concrete?

One of the most common questions we receive from both homeowners and professionals alike is if wood flooring can be installed over concrete. The answer is, YES! In fact, many homes are built on a concrete slab rather than a crawl space. So, if you want wood floors and are dealing with concrete, don’t worry. Here’s how to manage the job with both solid wood and engineered flooring:

Methods to Install Wood Floor Over Concrete

by Andrew St. James

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I. Solid wood over concrete

A) Direct glue down – requires boards with no crook or bow, not over 6” wide

a. Full spread
i. Over sealed concrete, compare or refer to Bostik Best over MVP trowel on
ii. Multifunction adhesive, Bostik Ultra SingleStep
iii. Adhesive and Bone Dry

b. Sika type partial glue for sound reduction – same requirement as full spread

B) Nail to plywood installed over concrete – most common method

a. Mechanically fastened plywood over vapor retarder (PE, PE + asphalt, Fortiflash)
b. Float 16” strips of plywood over vapor retarder (NWFA1 Ch 6)
c. Float double plywood fastened together over vapor retarder (NWFA1 Ch 6)
d. Glue down plywood to concrete

C) Sleepers

a. Sleepers glued to concrete (NWFA1 Appendix I) not for all widths and thicknesses
b. Sleepers over rubber pads for dance floors or sports floors

D) Plywood over sleepers for plank or shorts

II. Engineered

A) Direct glue down – most common, if concrete is sealed and floor is well made with water resistant backer and quality glues will dry out fine if dried out relatively quickly

B) Float over pad – disadvantage if leak or floor occurs

C) Install plywood and nail – will only dry out after leak if second story or higher

D) Self Adhesive sheets – no known NWFA sanction

E) Over sheet vinyl – more common in some areas, no known NWFA sanction

NWFA, National Wood Flooring Association Installation Guidelines, Call for further references.

Goodwin is happy to work with you and provide technical expertise and guidance. For more information, feel free to give us a call!

Wood is Wonderful!

Interesting Facts About This Amazing Natural Resource Wood is one of the world’s most precious and versatile natural resources.  Although the advent of sophisticated manufacturing processes and man-made materials have lent to wood often taken being taken for granted in modern times, it is making a strong comeback!  Here are three interesting facts about this […]

Reclaimed Wood Flooring… 5 Things to Learn in 5 Minutes

The following tips have links if you want more detail. Or call and talk with our in-house technical expert, Andrew St. James.

1. Help in choosing a reclaimed wood floor…

Begin with a few choices:
· Do you want a unique floor with a story?
· Light, medium or dark? Consistent or color variation?
· Pin stripes, bold arches or subtle graining?
· Single or random widths?
· ‘Character’, pristine or in between?
· How about knots or do you want ‘clear’?
Maybe you just want to see a few of these characteristics in River Recovered Heart PineLegacy Heart PineRiver Recovered Heart Cypress… or Sustainably Harvested Woods.

Antique Heart Pine is the most frequently specified reclaimed wood.’Virgin growth’ heart pine, the ‘wood that built America’. is all heartwood, very hard and comes in many grades.

Some of the more commonly available reclaimed woods include: American Chestnut, Heart Cypress, Douglas Fir, Eastern White Pine and Oak.

2. Which finish should you use on reclaimed wood?

The finish you choose can dramatically change the look of your floor. While most reclaimed wood is sanded and finished smooth to the touch, you can have a distressed floor. Distressing simulates old, old floors or barn siding and is usually done on milling machines, though it can also be done onsite by craftsmen.

How you want to maintain your wood floor determines if you want polyurethane that requires a professional to repair or if you want an oil finish that you can refresh when scratches occur. The oil finishes are very natural and low sheen; however, they can be made to have degrees of shine. They are especially appropriate for heavy traffic and come with easy maintenance products.

3. Would solid or engineered reclaimed wood work best for you?

Engineered wood is a growing market. Goodwin began engineered flooring to help conserve the rare River Recovered® wood. While solid wood floor may remain the ‘gold standard’ for those who can accommodate its greater demands, now you can have ‘USA made’ engineered flooring that looks and lasts like solid and is easier to fit into the construction cycle.

4. Not all reclaimed wood is equal…

To consistently manufacture a well made reclaimed wood floor that is properly kiln-dried, precisely milled, graded to established standards and backed by in-house technical expertise requires a considerable investment. Reclaimed wood can be a confusing niche. You may want to know some terminology when specifying antique heart pine. Building design professionals may want our free continuing education course on Architectural and Design Uses of Reclaimed Wood.

5. Installation tips to help your reclaimed wood perform well for a lifetime and beyond.

Once you have chosen your floor, what about installation? How to select a wood floor professional, even tips on existing subfloors are on our blogs. It is possible to get any stair parts or millwork in the same grade as your floor.

Engineered floor installation, when glued to concrete, needs to have an elastomeric type adhesive made for engineered wood. We generally suggest a vapor retarder over the slab. Even if the slab is dry now a seal coat ensures against future leaks or storms.

Just a few of the important tips to help ensure your solid wood floor installation:
1. The sub floor needs to be flat and level to within 3/16” over 10 feet for nail down or flat within 1/8” over 6 feet for glue down installation.
2. The moisture content of the wood floor and the sub-floor need to match the expected indoor temperature and relative humidity once the building has been occupied. Be sure to use a pin type moisture meter on dense reclaimed wood.
3. Enough ‘cleats’ for nail down jobs will help prevent the floor from moving too much. You should nail a 6” inch wide floor every 4”, an 8” inch wide floor every 3”, etc.

Call 800-336-3118 anytime we can help with your reclaimed wood questions.

Wood Floors Over Concrete

There are many questions about gluing down solid wood flooring to concrete.  The traditional industry standards for wood floor installation limited the direct glue down of solid wood flooring over concrete to short pieces or parquet patterns.  A well made engineered wood floor looks like a solid floor but avoids some of the installation difficulties.  The backer of the engineered flooring helps reduce the movement with moisture changes.  For many applications this is the best solution.

With the advent of elastomeric adhesives gluing solid flooring directly to concrete has become more common.  NOFMA produced a technical publication outlining recommended procedures for installing solid wood floors to concrete about five years ago.  Despite the inherently higher risks of gluing solid to concrete it has become an accepted practice for many people in the industry.  This installation method takes more effort to manage the risks.  Moisture issues are the primary concern.  Test to see if the concrete is dry enough.  The ASTM F2170-2 test is a widely accepted procedure which measures the relative humidity inside the concrete.  It is often prudent to apply a sealer to the concrete just in case moisture is introduced into the concrete at a later time. Then if the concrete gets wet in the future a trowel on moisture cured urethane vapor barrier or penetrating sealer such as Bone Dry which was applied prior to installing the floor can keep the water away from the wood. An alternative to a glue installation is to install a plywood subfloor over the concrete then nail down the flooring.

Reclaimed Wood Floors, Concrete, and Water

In the antique wood floor industry we often hear the comment that reclaimed wood flooring never needs acclimation. Unfortunately this is not the case. The high resin content of antique Longleaf pine diminishes the width changes driven by moisture fluctuations but does not eliminate them. Moisture concerns need to be addressed when using heart pine wooden flooring just as with other wooden floors especially if the subfloor is concrete.

Let’s start by listing a few observations

-Wood floors are often installed over concrete subfloors.
-The majority of wood floor complaints are moisture related.
-Untreated concrete readily absorbs, conducts, and emits water.

The combination of concrete and wood flooring calls for planning before the installation begins to avoid problems during the lifetime of the floor.

One of the first questions might be ’is the concrete dry enough now?’ Moisture meters or testing water vapor emission from the surface of the concrete can indicate if the concrete is wet. In some cases these tests are not reliable indicators of conditions that will lead to a successful wood flooring installation. Devices that measure the interior relative humidity within the concrete have been used in Europe for some time and are now often used here. If the moisture level is too high consider installing a vapor barrier or a penetrating sealer designed for use under wood flooring.
Concrete that is dry now may be exposed to water later. On-grade concrete can absorb water if exterior surface water accumulates or if the soil moisture levels increase. Once the water is introduced into concrete it travels to affect adjacent areas. If a vapor barrier was not installed the moisture can cause problems with an existing wood floor installation.

Non absorbing cushion such as closed cell foam is usually used under floating floors. Using porous padding material under floating floors introduces the possibility of retaining moisture if excess water is temporarily present.

Leaks from plumbing, appliances, roofs, or other building sources can result in wet wood floors. The National Wood Flooring Association suggests removing the water and drying a flooded floor promptly. For more details refer to the NWFA publication C200, ‘Problems Causes and Cures’. Some floors can not be saved. If the concrete under the floor has been wet it is important to verify that it has dried out before replacing a floor.

 

Be Aware of Water in Concrete

When a client’s water heater flooded their Goodwin Heart Pine engineered wood floor the insurance company called in a restoration contractor. The contractor pulled up half the floor to the point where they said the water had gone in the concrete. After three days of dehumidification they declared the concrete dry.

Following the National Wood Floor Association’s procedure we used a concrete meter that requires drilling a small hole 40% of the depth of the slab. The meter readings were much higher than recommended to install a wood floor over concrete.

We pulled up the remainder of the floor so that the entire slab could be dried. And we provided the restoration contractor with the meter readings and a study on water movement through concrete. Fortunately, they agreed to bring back the dehumidification system and get the slab to the proper moisture content.

Wood floors are not rocket science; however, they do demand a scientific approach to water and subfloors of all types. Call if you would like us to send you the research paper on how to properly test concrete for moisture content.

Best wishes for great wood floors all the time for the longterm.

Advanced Wood Floor Inspector Training

Goodwin Heart Pine hosted students from across the country for a four day class taught by Howard Brickman. With 30 years of experience, Brickman’s expertise spans several parts of the wood flooring industry: contracting, distribution, professional development courses, mill and site inspecting, depositions, and trial testimony.

Topics included:
• Wood Science & Anatomy
• Moisture & Wood “the true relationship”
• Proper Use of Moisture Meters
• Calculating Shrinkage
• Effects of Site Conditions like Temperature, Relative Humidity, Storage Conditions and HVAC systems
• Basics of Building Construction
• Flooring Installation, Sanding, & Finishing
• How to Evaluate Crawlspaces, Basements & Concrete substrates
• Inspection Techniques, Ethics & Report Writing